Criminal Defense Attorney inWest Ashley, SC

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CDH Law Firm: Giving Hope to
Criminal Defense Clients in
West Ashley, SC

Getting charged with a crime in West Ashley can be a traumatic experience. Even "petty" crimes can cause an individual's life to fall apart professionally and personally. Spending time in jail is bad enough, but the ramifications of a criminal record run deep, resulting in loss of employment, loss of friends, and even family. For many people, having a zealous criminal defense attorney in West Ashley, SC, to defend their rights is the only shot they have of living a normal life.

That's why, if you have been charged with a crime, you need the help of a veteran criminal defense lawyer early in the legal process. That's where CDH Law Firm comes in – to give you or your loved one hope when you need it the most.

Our criminal defense law firm was founded to help people just like you - hardworking men and women who are looking at diminished employment opportunities and a possible lifetime of embarrassment. But with our team of experts fighting by your side, you have a much better chance of maintaining your freedom and living a normal, productive life. When it comes to criminal law in West Ashley, we've seen it all. With decades of combined experience, there is no case too complicated or severe for us to handle, from common DUI charges to complicated cases involving juvenile crimes. Unlike some of our competition, we prioritize personalized service and cutting-edge criminal defense strategies to effectively represent our clients.

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Clients rank Cobb Dill & Hammett, LLC as the top choice for West Ashley criminal defense because we provide:

  • One-on-One Counsel
  • Free Consultation
  • Education on the West Ashley Legal Process and Its Risks
  • Ardent, Effective Representation
  • Commitment to Our Clients and Defending Their Rights
  • Prompt Inquiry Response
  • Robust Experience with Criminal Law Cases in West Ashley
  • Innovative Defense Strategies
  • Effective, Thorough Research and Investigation

Choosing the right criminal defense lawyer in West Ashley can mean the difference between conviction and acquittal. Our firm has represented thousands of clients in the Lowcountry, and we're ready to defend you too. Some of our specialties include:

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The-Cobb-Dill-Hammett-Difference

DUI Cases
in West Ashley, SC

DUI penalties in West Ashley can be very harsh. Many first-time DUI offenders must endure a lifelong criminal record, license suspension, and the possibility of spending time in jail. Officers and judges take DUI very seriously, with 30% of traffic fatalities in South Carolina involving impaired drivers, according to NHTSA. Criminal convictions can have lasting impacts on your life, which is why CDH Law Firm works so hard to get these charges dismissed or negotiated down. In some cases, we help clients avoid jail time altogether.

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When you hire our DUI defense firm, our team will always work towards your best interests and will go above and beyond to achieve the best outcome in your case. Depending on the circumstances of your DUI charges, we will investigate whether:
  • Your DUI stop was legal
  • You were administered a field sobriety test correctly
  • The breathalyzer used was calibrated correctly and properly maintained
  • Urine and blood tests were administered and collected properly

The bottom line? Our criminal law defense attorneys will do everything possible to keep you out of jail with a clean permanent record. It all starts with a free consultation, where we will take time to explain the DUI process. We'll also discuss your defense options and speak at length about the differences between going to trial and accepting a plea bargain.

DUI Penalties in West Ashley, SC

The consequences of a DUI in West Ashley depend on a number of factors, including your blood alcohol level and how many DUIs you have received in the last 10 years. If you're convicted, the DUI charge will remain on your criminal history and can be seen by anyone who runs a background check on you. Sometimes, a judge will require you to enter alcohol treatment or install an interlock device on your automobile.

If you're on the fence about hiring a criminal defense lawyer in West Ashley, SC, consider the following DUI consequences:

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First Offense

Offense

48 hours to 90 days

in jail

with fines ranging from

$400 to $1,000

Second Offense

Offense

Five days to three years

in jail

with fines ranging from

$2,100 to $6,500

Third Offense

Offense

60 days to five years

in jail

with fines ranging from

$3,800 to $10,000

Additional consequences can include:

1

Alcohol or Drug Treatment

When convicted of DUI in South Carolina, most offenders must join the Alcohol and Drug Safety Action Program. This program mandates that offenders complete a drug and alcohol assessment and follow the recommended treatment options.

 Criminal Defense Attorney West Ashley, SC

2

Community Service

Some first-time DUI offenders in West Ashley may choose to complete community service in lieu of jail time. Community service hours are usually equal to the length of jail time an offender would be required to serve.

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Sanctions to Your Driver's License

Typically, when a person is convicted of driving under the influence in West Ashley, their driver's license is restricted or suspended. The length of restriction or suspension depends on how many prior DUI convictions an individual has.

First DUI Offense

First-time DUI offenders must endure a six-month license suspension. Drivers convicted with a blood-alcohol level of .15% or more do not qualify for a provisional license. However, sometimes they may still drive using an ignition interlock device.

Second DUI Offense

Offenders convicted of a second DUI charge must use an ignition interlock device (IID) for two years.

Third DUI Offense

Offenders convicted of a third DUI charge must use an ignition interlock device (IID) for three years. That term increases to four years if the driver is convicted of three DUIs in five years.

Immobilized Vehicle

For offenders with two or more convictions, the judge will immobilize their vehicle if it is not equipped with an IID. When a judge immobilizes a vehicle, the owner must turn over their registration and license plate. Clearly, the consequences of receiving a DUI in West Ashley can be life-changing, and not in a good way. The good news is that with CDH Law Firm, you have a real chance at beating your charges and avoiding serious fines and jail time. Every case is different, which is why it's so important that you call our office as soon as possible if you are charged with a DUI.

Free Consultation

Traffic Violation Cases

Most drivers brush off traffic law violations as minor offenses, but the fact of the matter is they are criminal matters to be taken seriously. Despite popular opinion, Traffic Violation cases in West Ashley can carry significant consequences like fines and even incarceration. If you or someone you love has been convicted of several traffic offenses, your license could be suspended, restricting your ability to work and feed your family.

Every driver should take Traffic Violations seriously. If you're charged with a traffic crime, it's time to protect yourself and your family with a trusted criminal defense lawyer in West Ashley, SC. Cobb Dill Hammett, LLC is ready to provide the legal guidance and advice you need to beat your traffic charges. We'll research the merits of your case, explain what charges you're facing, discuss your defense options, and strategize an effective defense on your behalf.

Common West Ashley
Traffic Violations That CDH Law
Firm Fights

There are dozens and dozens of traffic laws in West Ashley, all of which affect drivers in some way. Our West Ashley defense attorneys fight a full range of violations, including but not limited to the following:

 Law Firm West Ashley, SC
  • Driving Under Suspension: If you drive while your license is suspended, revoked, or canceled, you could be looking at 30 days in jail and fines up to $300.
  • Driving Under the Influence: Operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated on drugs or alcohol is illegal and often results in jail time and fines.
  • Reckless Driving: You could be ordered to pay up to $200 in fines or jailed for up to 30 days if you drive with wanton disregard for the safety of other people.
  • Racing: You can be cited and fined if you aid or participate in street racing.
  • Hit and Run: When you leave the scene of an accident that involved injury to another party, you can be arrested. This serious charge can lead to up to one year in jail and fines of up to $5,000 for first-time offenders.
  • Disregard Traffic Signals: Drivers must obey all traffic signals and control devices, less they be ticketed and sometimes fined.

As seasoned traffic violation lawyers, we know how frustrating it can be to get charged with a Traffic Violation. While some traffic charges can be minor, others are severe and can affect your life for years to come. Don't leave your fate up to chance – call CDH Law Firm today for the highest-quality Traffic Violation representation in West Ashley.

Juvenile Crime Cases in
West Ashley, SC

At Cobb Dill Hammett, LLC, we understand that children are still growing and learning about the world around them. As such, they may make mistakes that get them into trouble with the law. Children and teens who are arrested in West Ashley can face much different futures than other children their age. Some face intensive probation, while others are made to spend time in jail.

This happens most often when a child's parents fail to retain legal counsel for their son or daughter. Cases referred to the South Carolina Department of Juvenile Justice often move quicker than adult cases, so finding a good lawyer is of utmost importance. With that said, a compassionate criminal defense attorney in West Ashley, SC, can educate you and your child about their alleged charges. To help prevent your child from going to a detention center, we will devise a strategy to achieve favorable results in their case.

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Juvenile Detention Hearings

Unlike adults, juveniles don't have a constitutional right to a bond hearing. Instead, once your child is taken into custody a Detention Hearing is conducted within 48 hours. This hearing is similar to a combination of a Bond Hearing and a Preliminary Hearing. Unfortunately, there is little time to prepare for these hearings, which is why you must move quickly and call CDH law firm as soon as possible.

Our team gathers police reports, petitions, interviews your child at the DJJ, speaks with you about the case and talks to the prosecutor to discover if they have plans for detention. In most cases, we strive to avoid detention and seek alternatives like divisionary programs or treatment facilities. This strategy better addresses your child's issues and keeps them out of the juvenile legal system in West Ashley. If your child is charged with a crime, and South Carolina decides to prosecute, your child will appear before a family court judge, who will find them delinquent or not delinquent. There are no juries in juvenile cases in South Carolina, which is why it's crucial to have a lawyer present to defend your child if they go in front of a judge.

Common penalties for juveniles charged with crimes in West Ashley include:

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  • Probation: Children charged with probation are released to their parents or guardians. Depending on their charges, they must abide by certain stipulations while at home and may be subject to random drug screenings. Violation of probation often results in jail time.
  • 90 Days in Juvenile Detention Center: When probation is not a viable option, prosecutors may push for 90 days of jail time in a juvenile detention facility.
  • Juvenile Detention: Children who commit very serious crimes can be sent to a juvenile detention center for a long time. These sentences can last up to the child's 21st birthday.
  • School Expulsion: When a child is convicted of a crime, their school is notified of the offense. Sometimes, the administration may decide to expel the child from school for the misdemeanors or felonies they commit.

We Fight to Protect
Your Rights So You Can
Provide for Your Family

Whether you are facing a DUI charge or a serious traffic violation, CDH Law Firm is here to fight for your rights so you can continue living life. The future might seem bleak, but our criminal defense lawyers in West Ashley, SC, have the tools, experience, and strategy to win your case, as we have with so many others. Don't lose hope – call our office today and maintain your freedom tomorrow.

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Call Now 843-936-6680 PH

Free Consultation

Latest News in West Ashley, SC

Dead vultures found in West Ashley positive for avian flu, cannot be removed

WEST ASHLEY, S.C. (WCBD) — South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) has confirmed that some dead vultures found in a West Ashley neighborhood tested positive for a highly pathogenic avian flu.Dore Carlo originally found dozens of the dead vultures near two retention ponds behind his home on May 7....

WEST ASHLEY, S.C. (WCBD) — South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) has confirmed that some dead vultures found in a West Ashley neighborhood tested positive for a highly pathogenic avian flu.

Dore Carlo originally found dozens of the dead vultures near two retention ponds behind his home on May 7.

“We had friends come over, who had a golf cart, and we took a ride back here and saw dozens of dead ones,” Carlo recalled.

He reported it to the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR), which took samples from the birds on May 10.

“DHEC advised me to get the word out best I could to keep children and pets away from the area,” Carlo said.

Health officials said avian flu can spread through any contact with the birds, as well as through their feathers or fecal material. However, the risk of people or pets contracting the virus is considered low.

“Anytime it does happen, that’s when we call it a novel flu strain – or novel infection – anytime it goes from animal host to human host,” said Jonathan Knoche, a DHEC public health physician.

Will Dillman, SCDNR assistant chief of wildlife, said direct sunlight and summer heat help kill the virus.

“As the weather heats up this should be less prevalent and run its course,” he said.

Almost a month after the dead vultures were first reported, Carlo said they are still losing two or three vultures a day, and more than 20 carcasses still sit in the neighborhood.

Now, he wants to know who will get rid of all the carcasses surrounding the retention ponds where people walk their dogs and children play.

“There’s other diseases I’m sure will come along from all these dead birds, not to mention they are bringing other animals around that would be feeding off of them,” said Carlo.

Both SCDNR and DHEC said there is nothing they can do to remove the dead birds.

“Moving those carcasses around to other places has the potential to spread that [avian flu] around,” said Dillman.

Carlo said he is working with his homeowner’s association to remove the carcasses to keep his family and neighbors safe.

The Count on 2 Investigators did reach out to the HOA property manager to see what other avenues they are taking since SCDNR and DHEC will not remove the dead vultures.

We have yet to hear back.

Plan approved to replace West Ashley middle school to reduce capacity

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The Charleston County School Board of Trustees has okayed a plan from staff to replace the current C.E. Williams North campus with a new school.At a Committee of the Whole meeting on Tuesday, the board voted to continue the current middle school configuration in West Ashley dividing sixth-grade students from seventh and eighth-grade students who currently go to C.E. Williams South, near West Ashley High School.The plan that would replace the sixth-grade campus would also allow Pattison’s Academy ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The Charleston County School Board of Trustees has okayed a plan from staff to replace the current C.E. Williams North campus with a new school.

At a Committee of the Whole meeting on Tuesday, the board voted to continue the current middle school configuration in West Ashley dividing sixth-grade students from seventh and eighth-grade students who currently go to C.E. Williams South, near West Ashley High School.

The plan that would replace the sixth-grade campus would also allow Pattison’s Academy for Comprehensive Education (PACE) to fund the design and construction of its facilities on the North campus. PACE is a specialty charter school run by a non-profit for students with multiple disabilities. They’re currently operating out of the former St. Andrews Middle School location.

The board committee also approved the expansion of the seventh/eighth grade C.E. Williams South campus by adding eight classrooms.

Despite the new building for sixth-grade students, the district’s plan does not expand capacity. The current building is underutilized with an enrollment of 363 this year. The building capacity is 904 according to data presented at the meeting.

The new building will be built to hold 600 students, with an expansion capacity of 900. This stands in stark contrast to the South campus which is nearing capacity. That building holds 969 students and currently has 835 students.

However, the district contends West Ashley is not growing as fast as it appears. If current projections remain unchanged the North campus is not expected to exceed 431 students in the next six years. The South campus is expected to peak at 848 students over the same time period.

Former West Ashley High School principal Lee Runyon says the district says the district’s plan is not properly taking into account growth in West Ashley.

“I think that the current plan is again short-sighted and smacks of continued use of taxpayer dollars to try and put a Band-Aid on the problem of systemic growth,” Runyon said. “Anytime you’re running an organization, you’re either growing or you’re dying. If the district is projecting flatline growth in a community that is exploding with residential growth, I think that’s poor leadership.”

Parents like Ragan DuBose-Morris say there are plenty of kids in West Ashley, but many parents are opting to send their middle schoolers out of District 10 to seek out more traditional options.

“West Ashley is the only area in Charleston County that does not have a traditional K-12 pipeline so that you can attend at a traditional elementary, middle and high school configuration,” DuBose-Morris said. “That has been a problem.”

The district’s own numbers suggest only 65 percent of students living in West Ashley attend the two campuses. Despite living in West Ashley, DuBose-Morris chooses to take her children to schools in North Charleston. She says whenever a child has to move to a new school there’s a transitional period that disrupts education. She says she wants to eliminate as many of those transitions as possible.

“They [children] have the knowledge of being in an environment for six through 12th grade,” DuBose-Morris said. “So we have stability, they’re not transitioning between schools. The guidance counselors know who they are. Their teachers know who they are. They’re able to progress through a process in which they have support.”

The current configuration was initiated in part to produce more diverse schools. Constituent board chair for District 10 (West Ashley) Rodney Lewis says the schools are now more diverse and the sixth-grade academy model can work. He says the smaller classes away from the influence of older students are helpful for students to enter adolescents.

“Any time there’s a new program it never just jumps off the first two or three years,” Lewis said. “You got to work it. It’s like a business. You start a business you won’t go to the top automatically. You have to grow there. Allow this to grow and you will see how it works.”

The project is part of the Phase Five Capital Buildings Program that is being funded by a one percent sales tax approved by voters in 2020. The project is budgeted for $40 million and is expected to be completed in 2026.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

West Ashley brewery adds 2nd taproom; hard kombucha brewery opening downtown

Two new taprooms are coming to Charleston in the next month.One is a newcomer specializing in lagers and hard kombucha, while the other is a household name known for signature beers like the Sungazer hazy IPA.Craft beer drinkers will find that beer and other refreshing sippers at Avondale brewery Charles Towne Fermentory, which will add a second taproom outfitted with a spacious beer garden, site owner Adam Goodwin told The Post and Courier.Thos...

Two new taprooms are coming to Charleston in the next month.

One is a newcomer specializing in lagers and hard kombucha, while the other is a household name known for signature beers like the Sungazer hazy IPA.

Craft beer drinkers will find that beer and other refreshing sippers at Avondale brewery Charles Towne Fermentory, which will add a second taproom outfitted with a spacious beer garden, site owner Adam Goodwin told The Post and Courier.

Those who attended Charleston Beer Week might recognize the new taproom called The Garden by Charles Towne Fermentory. The 1331 Ashley River Road compound, that was previously occupied by Wine and Design, hosted Beer Week’s grand finale in November 2021.

“When I found this property it was kind of just perfect,” Goodwin said. “We ended up fully gutting the building. We added (a nearly) 1,000-square-foot covered deck out back and then did all the landscaping outside to make it a little more of an accommodating place to hang and enjoy beer.”

Goodwin has the capability to brew small test batches at the new location, but the majority of The Garden’s 8-14 beers will come from Charles Towne Fermentory’s 5,000-square-foot Avondale brewery at 809 Savannah Highway.

Because of South Carolina’s three-tier system, Goodwin must purchase his own beer from a distributor in order to sell at The Garden, which will also offer wine and cider for non-beer drinkers.

The Garden will host a grand opening party May 28, with Co-Hog and Foxes Fried popping up with food at the event. Moving forward, The Garden will be open from 2-10 p.m. Monday-Friday, noon-10 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Sunday.

As Charles Towne Fermentory expands, downtown Charleston’s brewery district is adding another brewery to a list that already includes destinations like Revelry Brewing Co., Munkle Brewing Co. and Edmund’s Oast Brewing Co.

Specializing in lagers and hard kombucha, Bevi Bene Brewing Co. is located in The Lumberyard development at 1859 Summerville Ave. in downtown Charleston. Guests can expect to find eight beers and a handful of hard kombuchas when the new brewery opens June 18.

Husband-and-wife entrepreneurs Marissa and Clay Carlisle are behind Bevi Bene, which means “drink well” in Italian. The 5,000-square-foot space features an outdoor patio and mural by Savannah artist JULU that is visible heading northbound on Interstate 26.

“We’re a lager focused brewery,” Marissa Carlisle said. “We will have sours and then we’ll be introducing hard kombucha to the Charleston community.”

Specifically, Bevi Bene will serve traditional lagers, kettle sours and hard kombucha. “Mostly sessionable stuff which means lower alcohol just because we want people to come stay awhile,” according to Clay Carlisle.

To make the hard kombucha, he brews regular kombucha that’s put in a closed fermenter with more sugar and brewer’s yeast. The yeast eats the sugar, converting it into ethanol (alcohol produced by fermentation). Bevi Bene is believed to be the first Charleston area brewery to offer hard kombucha.

The brewery will host a grand opening on June 25, with food trucks Chucktown Meatball Co. and Vibrant Alkaline Vegan Meals serving at the event.

Once open, Bevi Bene will serve customers from 1-8 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday, noon-9 p.m. Friday-Saturday and noon-9 p.m. Sunday.

Editorial: Find better traffic solutions for West Ashley than I-526 extension

Skeptics of extending Interstate 526 from U.S. Highway 17 to Johns and James islands have called the project “a code, not a road,” a pithy rhyme that describes the project’s impracticality while recognizing the serious traffic problems — and the very real frustrations over those problems — that supporters have hoped the new road would magically solve.But with its price tag rising from $725 million several years ago to $2.35 billion today, and with Charleston County required to pay all but $380 million of ...

Skeptics of extending Interstate 526 from U.S. Highway 17 to Johns and James islands have called the project “a code, not a road,” a pithy rhyme that describes the project’s impracticality while recognizing the serious traffic problems — and the very real frustrations over those problems — that supporters have hoped the new road would magically solve.

But with its price tag rising from $725 million several years ago to $2.35 billion today, and with Charleston County required to pay all but $380 million of that — the state capped its commitment at $420 million and already has spent more than $45 million toward that cap — the project’s status has gone from impractical to practically ridiculous. Or, as Councilman Henry Darby said Thursday, “I don’t know whether to laugh or cry.”

Instead of getting kicked by the mule yet again, it’s time for Charleston County and state transportation officials to back away from the special status of this project, also known as the Mark Clark extension (even though it would be a 45 mph parkway, not an interstate), and instead redouble their efforts on other traffic solutions that can be completed more quickly, less expensively and with more widespread public favor.

This road is going nowhere fast, but that reality must not make officials too complacent to tackle the serious congestion problems that made extension advocates think it was a good idea in the first place. Even if a magical solution were to appear, the extension still would take more than a dozen years to build. S.C. Secretary of Transportation Christy Hall has recommended proceeding with about $150 million in engineering work to get the project ready for bid, but we urge her and Charleston County not to spend another cent.

Instead, they should use that money to launch a special planning effort to identify better options for easing congestion in West Ashley as well as on Johns and James islands. That would move us toward a solution faster than somehow hoping there will be a way forward for the Mark Clark extension when the state Transportation Department returns to the county in a few months with an even more refined cost estimate. Some council members suggest opponents have delayed 526 and driven up its costs. Even if that were true, and we would argue it’s not, they should think about this: Now that it costs more than $1 billion more, are those opponents going to give up now?

There are other solutions that aren’t as dramatic but also wouldn’t be nearly as costly or controversial, such as building the “pitchfork” roads on both sides of Maybank Highway from River Road to the Stono River bridge. The ongoing work to address Main Road, from Bees Ferry to Betsy Kerrison, also will help, and there are other projects in West Ashley that could help, too. We also believe our tax dollars would be better spent beginning a study on a bus rapid transit line through West Ashley similar to the one being developed along Rivers Avenue. In other words, we should seek many solutions, not a single, prohibitively expensive one.

Extending Interstate 526 across Johns and James islands in particular was never a good idea because of the environmental damage involved and the dubious impact it would have on traffic congestion, particularly when measured by the bang for the buck. More cost-effective solutions can address traffic without marring the edges of these two sea islands.

Look at it another way: From a traffic engineering standpoint, it might be easier to get around the Charleston region if Interstate 526 were extended from where it ends at U.S. Highway 17 in Mount Pleasant through the Old Village and across the Cooper River to where the James Island connector touches down on the peninsula. It would be like building our own ring road, like Interstate 285 around Atlanta.

Of course, nobody has suggested that — for a multitude of reasons that go far beyond cost.

For years, development on Johns Island has been allowed to spread rapidly while road improvements lagged far behind, a scenario that has played out in other parts of the Charleston metro area. Anyone who lives on Johns Island or travels there knows it’s a frustrating problem that also impacts West Ashley and James Island. But that’s another reason why state and local officials should step back from their grand 526 extension plan and refocus their thinking on more cost-effective, practical traffic solutions.

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

Tri-county school districts offering free meals this summer

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD)- With the end of the school year rapidly approaching, thousands of children across the state are at risk of going hungry.According to the South Carolina Department of Social Services, more than 467,000 children in South Carolina ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD)- With the end of the school year rapidly approaching, thousands of children across the state are at risk of going hungry.

According to the South Carolina Department of Social Services, more than 467,000 children in South Carolina qualify for free or reduced-price meals. State law mandates that all public schools participate in the National School Lunch Program.

To ensure children do not need to worry about where their next meal will come from, Tri-county school districts are offering free meal programs all summer long.

Charleston County

Charleston County School District is working to fill the nutrition gap during summer break with its Seamless Summer Feeding Program (SSFP).

The district reports that roughly half (25,000) of enrolled students qualify for free or reduced-price school meals, which is why they offer complimentary breakfast and lunches at locations throughout Charleston County.

Breakfast and homemade hot lunches will be prepared at 10 CCSD school kitchens and cafeterias and distributed to sites in McClellanville, North Charleston, James Island, Johns Island, Hollywood, downtown Charleston, and West Ashley for pickup. Serving and eating utensils, plates, napkins, and condiments will be provided.

Meals are prepared to meet federal meal patterns and nutritional requirements and lunches may include hot entrees such as crispy chicken nuggets, hamburgers, and hotdogs. Fresh fruits, vegetables, and low-fat chocolate and white milk are included with every meal.

Any child or teen (18 years old or younger) are eligible for free meals without prior approval.

The program starts June 6 and runs through August 5. Pickup locations will be posted here on June 10.

Berkeley County

Berkeley County School District is also offering a free meal service for children 18 years old and younger.

Beginning June 6, BSCD nutrition workers will serve meals every Monday through Thursday at the following locations:

Breakfast service is from 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. and includes 1 oz meat or meat alternate, 1 serving of grain, 1/2 cup juice or fruit, and an 8 oz milk.

Lunch service is from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and includes 2 oz meat or meat alternate, 1/2 cup vegetable, 1/2 cup fruit, 1 serving grain, and an 8 oz milk.

Hot meals are available at no cost to students, but children must eat at the site.

The program runs through July 28. Click here to see the menus.

Dorchester County

Through the Seamless Summer Option Meals Program, Dorchester District Two will provide breakfast and lunch on a first-come, first-served basis to all children 18 years old and younger.

Meals are served Monday through Thursday at the following locations:

Breakfast is available from 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. and lunch is available from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Each meal contains whole grains, protein, fruit or vegetable, and milk. As with Berkeley County, meals must be eaten at the pickup site.

In addition, DD2 schools conducting summer programs will provide complimentary breakfast and lunch to all program enrolled students.

The free meal program runs from June 6 to July 14.

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