Divorce Attorney in Myrtle Beach SC

Let's Talk!

Platform Lifts-phone-nuber 843-936-6680

If there were one universal truth" it would be that every family is different. We all have our own set of challenges to face and changes to go through. Sometimes" those changes are happy" like when a new baby is born. Other times" these changes involve uncertainty and loss" like in the event of a divorce.

If you are having to go through the pain of divorce" deal with a complicated custody issue" or are handling a different family-related legal matter" you might need help. At Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC" we understand that family issues are hard. Many of the family law clients that we work for have big questions about the future" leaving them over-stressed and full of worry. They are concerned about their children" their marriage" or both. They are wrestling with uncertainty and anxiety" having been served confusing documents that don't make sense. Sound familiar? A family law attorney in Myrtle Beach" SC" can help" whether you need a level-headed moderator or a trusted advocate in the courtroom.

At Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC" we have decades of combined experience serving the needs of families" from divorce proceedings to family formation issues. Our team is fiercely committed to our clients" and with a dedicated focus" stays up-to-date on the nuanced world of family law in Myrtle Beach. If you're looking for personal attention" unbiased representation" and a responsive family law attorney" look no further than our law firm.

Estate Planning Law Myrtle Beach, SC

If you're unsure of whether you need a family law lawyers in Myrtle Beach" ask yourself these questions:

  • Are you getting married?
  • Are you thinking about divorce?
  • Has your spouse served you with legal papers?
  • Are your kids not receiving the support that they are entitled to?

If you answered "yes" to any of the questions above" know that we are here to help you figure out your next steps. With CDH Law Firm by your side" you can have the confidence to face even the most difficult family law issues. All of our attorneys have years of experience" are incredibly responsive" and fight for your family's rights. We are happy to take as much time as you need to answer questions and help put your mind at ease for whatever lies ahead.

 Estate Planning Attorney Myrtle Beach, SC

Our firm specializes in a wide range of family law cases" including:

  • Divorce
  • Child Custody
  • Alimony
  • Adoptions
  • Child Support
  • Mediation
  • Property Division
  • More

If you have been left to manage a foreign family law situation" it's time to call Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC. We will sit down with you for an hour at absolutely no cost - because we understand what you're going through and know that you need answers" not another bill to pay.

To help provide you with a basic understanding of family law" keep reading for in-depth explanations on our areas of expertise.

The-Cobb-Dill-Hammett-Difference

Divorce lawyer in
Myrtle Beach" SC.

At Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC" we know all-too-well that a "one size fits all" approach isn't going to work very well for your unique situation. That's why we approach each divorce case from a personalized standpoint - something that we feel like each of our clients deserves.

 Estate Planning Lawyer Myrtle Beach, SC
Our goal is to help solve your family law issues and focus on your needs when your divorce is finalized. We will help develop a strategy for:
  • Meeting your post-divorce needs and objectives
  • Dividing marital property for maximum benefit
  • Maximizing time spent with your child as part of your divorce's parenting plan
  • Strengthen your role as a decision-maker for your child
  • Navigating your divorce proceedings and minimizing financial and emotional costs

By working together" our divorce law firm will help you rebuild your life and secure a better future for your family.

Divorces in South Carolina
- Different Than Other States

Unlike divorce law in other states" South Carolina divorce law doesn't allow spouses to receive an instant no-fault divorce. One or both spouses in the marriage must establish a legally acceptable reason for a divorce to happen. Grounds for a divorce in Myrtle Beach" SC include:

  • Desertion
  • Physical Cruelty
  • Habitual Drunkenness
  • Separation for One Year or More
  • Adultery
 Divorce Attorney Myrtle Beach, SC

If you or your spouse do not have the necessary grounds for divorce in Myrtle Beach" our family law firm can file a Separate Maintenance and Support action. This step lets the court order child custody" alimony" and marital bills until you can file for your divorce. During this period" Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC gathers pertinent info on your spouse's character and assets that can strengthen your case" should it be necessary.

Common Issues Associated
with Divorces in Myrtle Beach

A divorce in Myrtle Beach means more than the end of a marriage. It involves dividing the parties' debts and assets" determines child support and custody parameters" and can establish alimony. At Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC" many of our clients are able to reach agreements with their spouse to resolve these issues. Reaching an agreement lets both parties customize the terms of their divorce to conserve resources" avoid trial" and meet the family's needs.

Sometimes" however" two spouses cannot or will not come to terms with an agreement. In these situations" a trial is possible" and litigation is necessary. Our family law attorneys in Myrtle Beach" SC. are highly experienced litigators and are well-equipped to handle any disputes revealed in the conference or courtroom.

Common divorce issues include:

 Criminal Defense Attorney Myrtle Beach, SC
1.

Child Custody and Visitation

One of the most heart-wrenching" difficult decisions for parents going through a divorce is resolving child custody and visitation issues. Child custody refers to how much time each parent will spend with their child" and whether they can make decisions for them. According to South Carolina law" child custody and visitation time are based on what is best for the child.

 Personal Injury Attorney Myrtle Beach, SC
2.

Child Support

Like other U.S states" a formula is used in South Carolina to determine how much child support a person must pay. This formula recommends the amount of child support based on factors like how much income the parents make" the cost of childcare" and the obligation to support children from other relationships.

 Law Firm Myrtle Beach, SC
3.

Alimony

In South Carolina" there is no formula to determine how much alimony a person must pay. However" courts consider several factors when deciding if alimony is needed" how much alimony should be paid" and how long a spouse must pay it. Those factors include each spouse's ability and need to pay alimony" how long the marriage lasted" and any marital misconduct that occurred. To make matters more confusing" there are different alimony types" including lump sum" rehabilitative" and reimbursement.

 Attorney Myrtle Beach, SC
4.

Distribution of Property

In South Carolina" marital property is the property that each spouse amasses from the date of the wedding to the time a spouse files for divorce. That property can often include marital debt. In a South Carolina divorce" the courts will order an equitable division of property" meaning "fair" under all circumstances but not necessarily equal.

 Divorce Lawyer Myrtle Beach, SC

Understanding Child Custody in Myrtle Beach" SC

As mentioned above" decisions that involve child custody and visitation can be contentious for parents" both emotionally and legally. As experienced" empathetic divorce lawyers" we understand how difficult this process can be. When we work with clients going through child custody battles" we always make it a point to be with them through the ups and downs" to help them stay centered. Whether you are the husband or wife in your divorce" we share a common goal: finding an effective way to support your children and assure their wellbeing.

In South Carolina" child custody is a loaded term. In the most general definition" child custody determines when each parent is responsible for the physical care of the child and how much authority each parent has" to make decisions in their child's life.

No two child custody cases are the same" but a negotiated custody arrangement is usually preferred in the judge's eyes" as each parent has input in the process. If the parents cannot come to an amicable resolution" their fate is left in the hands of a Family Court Judge in South Carolina. The focus of child custody law is always on what is in the "best interests" of the child. What the judge determines to be the "best interests" changes depending on the judge.

There are different variations of "custody" in South Carolina (or custody arrangements)" each with varying degrees of authority. When you consult with our family law attorneys at Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC" we will go over the child custody process in detail and touch on each distinction to eliminate any confusion you have.

  • Help develop cooperative solutions to disputes or mediate when needed
  • Create an equitable parenting plan
  • Discuss the implications of the different forms of joint and sole custody
  • Problems related to child support
  • Modify court orders if you or your child's circumstances change
  • Enforcement of visitation and custody agreements
  • Much more
Many of the family law clients that walk into our office have big questions that are leaving them full of stress and worry. <

Many of the family law clients that walk into our office have big questions that are leaving them full of stress and worry.

Free Consultation
Estate Planning Law Myrtle Beach, SC

Understanding Child Support
in Myrtle Beach" SC

When children are involved in divorce cases" child support is often ordered. Several factors can impact whether child support is ordered" like the income-earning potential of the child's parents" any custody arrangements that are created" and what needs the child may have.

At Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC" we have years of experience with child support issues relating to:

  • Cases where child support is needed for stay-at-home parents
  • Modifications and enforcement of child support mandates
  • Resolving support and custody disputes
  • Mediation arrangements to reach an agreement on child support. Compared to litigation" going
  • the mediated route often means less stress and is more cost-effective than trial.

When you trust our family law firm in Myrtle Beach for representation" we can help calculate an estimate of how much child support you or your spouse may be ordered to pay. We can also perform a needs-based analysis in cases that involve large amounts of income. At the end of the day" our goal is to make this frustrating process as stress-free as possible for you" so that you can focus on living life and caring for your child.

Understanding Alimony in
Myrtle Beach" SC

Alimony (sometimes called spousal support or maintenance) is ordered by the court or negotiated between parties. This kind of spousal support has many factors" like the income of both spouses" how long they were married" and the age of each spouse. Like child custody and child support" trusted legal guidance is strongly recommended if you are facing potential alimony payments. Our family law attorneys will help you reach amicable arrangements for fair and appropriate alimony payments.

At Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC" your family law attorney in Myrtle Beach" SC" will help protect your interests and rights regarding:

 Estate Planning Attorney Myrtle Beach, SC
  • Alimony and business assets
  • Permanent or long-term alimony
  • Significant alimony in high-asset divorces
  • Modifications to alimony arrangements when you or your spouse's circumstances change
  • Enforcement of spousal support mandates" when needed

Understanding Division of
Property in Myrtle Beach" SC

When there are no children" marital property" or issues of alimony" divorces often proceed smoothly between amicable spouses. However" most divorces in South Carolina are much more complex. Typically" divorce involves a union between spouses that lasts for years and involves substantial marital property. This property can be personal property" real estate" family businesses" debts" out-of-state property" debts" bank accounts" and more.

In these nuanced situations" the applicable parties need assistance dividing their property. This help most often comes from seasoned family law attorneys like Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC.

When it comes to distribution of property" certain types of properties that are controversial" even under the property division rules in South Carolina. South Carolina is an equitable distribution state" meaning that marital property is divided equitably but not always equally.

If you are going through a divorce" it's important that you are aware of the following assets and the common issues their division presents:

 Estate Planning Lawyer Myrtle Beach, SC
Pensions

Pensions:

Generally" pensions are the second-largest asset in a marriage. When there are sufficient alternative income sources to compensate the non-pension holder" South Carolina divorce courts may leave the pension rights with the spouse who earned it" with future distribution available. Otherwise" a divorce court may enter a Qualified Domestic Relations Order requiring the pension administrator to pay both the former spouse and worker.

Family Home

Family Home:

The family home" or the primary residential property owned by the divorcing couple" is usually considered a marriage's biggest asset. Dividing this kind of property can be complex and frustrating" especially when there are kids involved.

Many divorcing couples have a hard time reaching an agreement on property division. Because the division of property depends on the complexity of you or your spouse's assets and liabilities" it is crucial to consult with an experienced family law attorney to provide guidance.

Latest News in Myrtle Beach, SC

SC breweries fear losing customers to stores with law change limiting 'to go' beer

MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. (WPDE) — The next time customers head to a brewery in South Carolina, they won't be allowed to purchase as much beer "to go" after a law changed.For the past two years, South Carolina breweries were allowed to sell up to 576 ounces of beer to go, but the pandemic-era law expired at the end of May, and now breweries can only sell up to 288 ounces.“It does equate to a case of beer of 12-ounce cans, but a lot of craft breweries now use 16-ounce cans, which is what we use, and so we can&rsqu...

MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. (WPDE) — The next time customers head to a brewery in South Carolina, they won't be allowed to purchase as much beer "to go" after a law changed.

For the past two years, South Carolina breweries were allowed to sell up to 576 ounces of beer to go, but the pandemic-era law expired at the end of May, and now breweries can only sell up to 288 ounces.

“It does equate to a case of beer of 12-ounce cans, but a lot of craft breweries now use 16-ounce cans, which is what we use, and so we can’t even sell a full case," Tidal Creek Brewhouse owner Adrian Sawczuk said.

The brewery is in the Market Common area of Myrtle Beach, and sell those 16-ounce cans in bundles of four, so this new change means they can only sell 4.5 bundles.

It’s just awkward to do that, and then it’s tough to explain to our customers, too.

Sawczuk said the 16-ounce can is a trend for craft beer right now, because people often drink 16 ounces in one sitting.

“Less waste, and easier to transport, takes up less room. It’s a pretty good packaging solution," he said.

The 288 ounce limit is established by a 2010 law, but state lawmakers approved the increased limit of 576 ounces in 2020.

It was extended each time it was about to expire, but lawmakers did not extend the increase this final time, so as of June 1, 2022, the limit returned to the 2010 law.

Faced with the change two years later, Sawczuk said he'd like to see no limit at all, just how it is for North Carolina.

“Try to explain that, right?." he said. "‘Well, I was just in Wilmington and I got three cases, and now I can only get a case and a half from you?’ It’s just an awkward conversation.”

In addition, he said they can lose customers to retail stores, who don't have a limit.

“We have a lot of out of town guests who love the experience, love the beer, and want to bring some home with them, so they can enjoy when they’re back home, or they can share with their family and friends," he said.

Sawczuk said if lawmakers needed a trial and error period, they had the last two years, and from his point of view, everything has been just fine.

Governor Henry's McMaster's office released the following statement to ABC15:

More broadly, I can tell you that this confusion is a result of archaic state laws that regulate the sale of alcohol in South Carolina and that the governor believes the General Assembly should take a hard look at how we can responsibly reduce the regulatory burden on these businesses.

Myrtle Beach Memorial Day crowds in 2021 were huge. Will this year be any different?

Last year, Myrtle Beach businesses wanted to open “the floodgates” to tourists, hoping to see as many visitors as possible.They sure got it. The occupancy rate for hotels and vacation rentals like Airbnb hovered near 90% during the weekend, according to the Myrtle Beach Area Chamber of Commerce. Restaurants and attractions had hours long wait times. Concerts were booked out well in advance. And traffi...

Last year, Myrtle Beach businesses wanted to open “the floodgates” to tourists, hoping to see as many visitors as possible.

They sure got it. The occupancy rate for hotels and vacation rentals like Airbnb hovered near 90% during the weekend, according to the Myrtle Beach Area Chamber of Commerce. Restaurants and attractions had hours long wait times. Concerts were booked out well in advance. And traffic? Oh, the traffic was endless.

But what about this year? Will crowds be just as huge? Will Myrtle Beach be overwhelmed with visitors?

The answer can’t be known for sure until the weekend arrives, but there are some signs that tourism has calmed down a bit compared to last year.

For one, the Chamber expects hotel occupancy to be about 80%, lower than the holiday weekend last year. Businesses are also a lot more prepared, Chamber CEO Karen Riordan said. Many of them started hiring as early as November of last year in preparation for spring. Also, the buildup of tourism season has been much slower. Rather than a deluge of visitors starting in March that never let up, growth this season has been much more gradual, Riordan said.

“2021 was a bit of an anomaly, not really consistent with anything else because so many people didn’t travel in 2020 and they sort of made up for that demand in 2021,” Riordan said.

So, if you’re heading to Myrtle Beach for Memorial Day weekend here’s what to expect as the Grand Strand celebrates the unofficial start to summer.

Hotels and vacation rentals have filled up slowly throughout the season, going from 30-40% occupancy before March to 60-70% most weeks now, with higher rates on the weekends, according to the Chamber.

“By not having this big surge of business like we saw in 2021, we’ve been able to handle the workforce situation a little bit more calmly,” Riordan said. ”This is the new normal now, so we’re better prepared. We know how to do this, and we’re getting to be pretty resilient.”

Hotel occupancy is overall lower than last year, but the cost of a stay has gone up considerably, especially for those booking at the last minute.

The Chamber’s lodging metrics show hotel rooms cost an average of 10-30% more than last year. Vacation rentals, such as Airbnb and VRBO, are even worse, with some weeks showing they are 45% more expensive per night than last year.

Restaurants are likely to be more pricey than they have been in past years, as inflation has eaten into budgets and driven up the cost of labor and food. Many restaurants still are struggling to find enough workers and have shortened their operating hours.

“Some businesses have decided that they are going to close on Sunday, even though, in theory, visitors would still be here,” Riordan said. “But let’s face it, a lot of them check out at 11 and then maybe go to the beach or they may start their journey home.”

And now it looks like businesses might not ever find those workers. Last week, South Carolina reported it had finally recovered the total number of jobs it lost at the start of the pandemic. The data has shown how many hospitality workers are not unemployed anymore — they left the industry altogether for something else, often something less stressful or higher paying, Federal Reserve economist Laura Ullrich said.

“All these jobs are hard jobs that have gotten harder due to COVID and the recovery most likely, and they’re also not really very high-paying sectors,” Ullrich said. With so many other jobs open, “it makes it very difficult to fill those positions in the lower wage, potentially higher stress sectors.”

To keep up, businesses will have to adapt, Riordan said, and automate wherever they can.

“People are being very creative,” she said. “They are being very resilient. And they’re saying, ‘This is what I need to keep the workforce that I have have sane and stable and rested and in a position to do their job and do it well.’”

The Myrtle Beach airport was one of the most obvious places that struggled to handle the surge in visitors in 2021, with lines just to get through security sometimes exceeding an hour and rental car lines running late into the night. This time around, the airport said it is better equipped for summer crowds. The Transportation Security Administration made some changes halfway through summer to speed up security processing, which cut down the lines considerably.

However, airlines such as Avelo, Southwest, Spirit and Frontier keep adding new flights to their schedules for Myrtle Beach. That means there will be a lot more people going through the airport, so keep these tips in mind:

With crowds come crowded beaches, and crowded beaches bring lots of shading devices. If you’re planning to bring a Shibumi Shade — those tents that often span 10-15 feet and fly overhead with two poles on either side — don’t. They are banned in North Myrtle Beach May 15 to Sept. 15. Only regular beach umbrellas are allowed. The rules are the same in Myrtle Beach from Memorial Day through Labor day. Surfside Beach allows tents, but they must be less than 10 feet by 10 feet in size.

Visiting the beach won’t be all sunshine, rainbows and umbrellas. Here’s what to know the two biggest complications ahead: weather and traffic.

Want something specific to do? Here’s two of the top highlights for events this weekend.

And remember, COVID is still in the air. If you are worried about getting it, make sure to practice social distancing, wear a mask and wash your hands often.

“Some of our residents wear masks and gloves when they are out. Please respect their choice. They may be in higher risk categories,” North Myrtle Beach said in its Memorial Day advisory. “We sometimes hear people say, ‘If you’re afraid, stay home.’ We remind you that this is their home.”

North Myrtle Beach has also banned all open fires and grilling on its beaches, a change from previous years.

Finally, don’t forget to put on sunscreen! Nobody wants to return to work or school looking like a tomato.

This story was originally published May 26, 2022 5:00 AM.

My son has autism. Here’s how the travel industry is supporting families with children on the spectrum

Surfside Beach and neighbouring Myrtle Beach, S.C., are the first officially autism-friendly beach destinations in the United States. Plus, how to plan an autism-friendly trip.At Surfside Beach, warm waves crash onto powdery sand that stretches for miles. My 14-year-old son jumps each curl of white foam with enthusiasm, hands flapping in excitement. Bennett, who has autism, loves beaches and the sensory stimulation provided by big waves and soft sand.He could stay in the water for hours.There are surf breaks backed by ...

Surfside Beach and neighbouring Myrtle Beach, S.C., are the first officially autism-friendly beach destinations in the United States. Plus, how to plan an autism-friendly trip.

At Surfside Beach, warm waves crash onto powdery sand that stretches for miles. My 14-year-old son jumps each curl of white foam with enthusiasm, hands flapping in excitement. Bennett, who has autism, loves beaches and the sensory stimulation provided by big waves and soft sand.

He could stay in the water for hours.

There are surf breaks backed by windblown dunes up and down the eastern seaboard, but Surfside Beach and neighbouring Myrtle Beach, S.C., are the first officially autism-friendly beach destinations in the United States.

Their commitment to inclusion goes far beyond the therapy provided by immersion in nature, and makes it easier for families like ours to enjoy a vacation.

Many restaurants, hotels and attractions in the area are autism-certified through the Champion Autism Network (CAN). Becky Large, who has a son on the spectrum, started the non-profit organization in Surfside Beach after moving here in 2012.

She realized the travel destination didn’t provide much support for local families — let alone tourists — whose children had been diagnosed with the developmental delay.

Autism is believed to affect one in 50 Canadian kids and youth, according to the latest report by the Public Health Agency of Canada, and it impacts how they interact with others, behave, communicate and learn.

CAN began by offering sensory-friendly movies for families, with dim lights and quieter sound, and grew to include measures at restaurants, hotels and attractions. In 2016, the Surfside Beach town council issued a proclamation that the destination was “autism friendly.”

“We started inviting all autism families to come play at the beach,” says Large.

Staff at participating businesses now complete online training to better understand autism, and how they can recognize and support someone with the condition. An autism-friendly hotel would endeavour to check a family into a room far from the noisy ice machine and elevators, for example, while a restaurant could seat them in a quiet booth.

“A person with autism might have a tantrum or meltdown, so a restaurant could prepare to put the food in to-go boxes, before it’s even come out,” explains Large of the considerations that could be taken.

This effort toward inclusion isn’t unique to the Grand Strand, South Carolina’s 97-kilometre arc of pristine beaches on the Atlantic coast. It’s part of a larger tourism industry trend, which is also seeing all-inclusive resorts like Beaches in the Caribbean and cruise lines such as Royal Caribbean offer dedicated programming tailored to travellers on the spectrum.

In addition to Surfside Beach and Myrtle Beach, cities like Mesa, Ariz., and Palm Springs, Calif., are aiming for destination-wide certification of hotels, restaurants and attractions, too.

Speaking from my own experience going places with Bennett, it’s a welcome shift. It’s a relief to travel among other families who “get it,” and to know that staff understand my kid’s quirks and won’t give me stink-eye if he has an outburst.

With a growing number of options now available, there are certified autism travel professionals to help families plan and book a holiday.

Victoria, B.C.-based autism travel adviser Angela Faminoff points clients toward destinations that are a good fit for their needs and interests. Since a whopping 87 per cent of families with a member on the autism spectrum don’t travel at all, according to a study by autism credentialing agency IBCCES, Faminoff’s job is to help families feel comfortable enough to leave home.

“That’s where I come in and say, ‘Let’s look at these places because your child will be embraced,’” says Faminoff, who calls restaurants, hotels and attractions in advance to make sure they can accommodate her families.

“It takes that pressure off,” she says. “It’s hard enough to plan your own trip, but when you have a child with autism or an intellectual disability, that adds an extra layer.”

In Surfside Beach and Myrtle Beach, families can get support with a CAN card, which can be requested online and discreetly lets staff know that someone in the party has autism.

We use our card at Johnny D’s Waffles and are seated in a quiet corner booth. When it’s time to pay for breakfast, the card also gets us a 10 per cent discount. Owner Jamie Daskalis has a 10-year-old son with autism, so it was important to her that her three restaurants participate.

“We let autism families jump to the front of the line and expedite their food, and if they need to bring outside food in, we allow that,” says Daskalis, who wants to make it easy for families to dine together. Johnny D’s even has noise-cancelling headphones available to borrow if the restaurant is busy and loud.

A number of area attractions are autism-certified, too. We get front-of-the-line privileges at the SkyWheel (kids with autism notoriously hate waiting in long queues), and are soon spinning high above the beach, with views of the ocean, boardwalk and rides that make Myrtle Beach a family magnet.

Ripley’s Aquarium of Myrtle Beach holds regular sensory-friendly days and even has a quiet room (with a private view of the shark tunnel), where overwhelmed kids can go to decompress. We visit in the evening when the crowds have thinned out, and we basically have the soothing fish tanks to ourselves.

But more than built attractions, my son loves nature, and this part of South Carolina delivers beyond the beach. On our final day, we head out on a kayak tour to look for critters like the American alligator in the cypress swamp along the edge of the Waccamaw River. Hastings Hensel, a guide with Black River Outdoors, says they get a number of guests with autism and I can see why.

Seated in the front of our tandem kayak, Bennett is calm and engaged during the meditative two-hour paddle beneath cypress trees and swamp oaks dripping with Spanish moss.

We spot a bright yellow prothonotary warbler flitting between the branches of a gum tree, a green heron looking for fish, and an osprey circling above its nest. Bennett is even convinced he sees an alligator lurking in the shallows, but it’s just a log bobbing in the tea-coloured water.

Still, Bennett’s two favourite things in South Carolina? “The alligator and the big waves.”

With its fine balance of nature’s therapy and autism-certified businesses, it’s easy to see why families like ours are coming to play at the beach.

Writer Lisa Kadane travelled as a guest of Visit Myrtle Beach and Discover South Carolina, which did not review or approve this article.

How to plan an autism-friendly trip

Choose an inclusive place: Both championautismnetwork.com and autismtravel.com list destinations, attractions and hotels/resorts that are autism-certified or autism-friendly.

Book with a specially trained expert: Consider using a certified autism travel professional (CATP) to help plan and book your trip. You can search the registry at ibcces.org.

Prepare your child pre-departure: This could entail making a story, or document with words and pictures that tell and show where you’ll be staying and what you’ll be doing. Include any travel requirements, like COVID testing, so there won’t be any surprises. (If wearing a mask in-flight is an issue for your child, you can request an exemption from this rule through your airline.)

SHARE:

Anyone can read Conversations, but to contribute, you should be registered Torstar account holder. If you do not yet have a Torstar account, you can create one now (it is free)

Conversations are opinions of our readers and are subject to the Code of Conduct. The Star does not endorse these opinions.

Wages have increased dramatically in Myrtle Beach, study says. Local businesses react

Some economists have dubbed the national labor market crisis, “The Great Resignation.” However, data shows that South Carolina’s labor market is dynamic, and local businesses agree.A press release from the South Carolina Department of Labor (DEW) shows that weekly wages in the Myrtle Beach metropolitan area have increased by 20.6% in the past two years, making it the highest in South Carolina.Store owners and employ...

Some economists have dubbed the national labor market crisis, “The Great Resignation.” However, data shows that South Carolina’s labor market is dynamic, and local businesses agree.

A press release from the South Carolina Department of Labor (DEW) shows that weekly wages in the Myrtle Beach metropolitan area have increased by 20.6% in the past two years, making it the highest in South Carolina.

Store owners and employees in the Market Common area have agreed that this is a transitional period rather than a mass exodus of America’s workforce.

Orvis, a clothing store in Market Commons, offered employees a performance based raise in January, and a cost of living raise this time last year. Store manager Chris Wait said that the raises were necessary.

“I think we are in a situation where you almost have to give raises in order to retain your staff,” Wait said.

It’s true that many South Carolinians have quit their jobs recently. About 90,000 workers quit their jobs in March 2022. However 122,000 were also hired that month, according to preliminary, seasonally adjusted data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Bryan Grady, SC Department of Labor and Employment Labor Market Information director, said one of the factors contributing to this is Myrtle Beach’s tourism industry. Unskilled labor, such as in the hospitality and leisure industry, has seen a higher turnover rate in the past two years.

“While there has been an increase in job turnover, the data clearly indicate that the number of people working in South Carolina has never been higher,” Grady said in a press release.

Mike Palermo, a manager at King’s Street Grille in Market Common said many workers he knows in the area have either gotten raises, or switched to jobs with higher wages.

“We are definitely hiring at a higher rate now for multiple hourly positions than we were a year ago,” Palermo said.

The unemployment rate fell to 3.3% in April according to the BLS, and has been steadily declining since December.

“It’s signs of a dynamic labor market,” Grady said.

‘Illumination park’ in Myrtle Beach brings dazzling light displays to Broadway at the Beach

Broadway at the Beach is getting a new massive new restaurant and bar — The Hangout — in the coming weeks, and it will be joined by a spectacular outdoor light display.On June 2, “Illumination Park: An Art Experience” opens to the public across the lawn from The Hangout. The exhibit and the restaurant a part of the new Key West Village section of Broadway at the Beach.“This art experience offers a visually vibrant and interactive backdrop for our guests to create life-long memories,” April De...

Broadway at the Beach is getting a new massive new restaurant and bar — The Hangout — in the coming weeks, and it will be joined by a spectacular outdoor light display.

On June 2, “Illumination Park: An Art Experience” opens to the public across the lawn from The Hangout. The exhibit and the restaurant a part of the new Key West Village section of Broadway at the Beach.

“This art experience offers a visually vibrant and interactive backdrop for our guests to create life-long memories,” April Dendy Martin, senior vice president of Broadway at the Beach owner Burroughs & Chapin, said in a statement. “As part of our redevelopment efforts at Broadway at the Beach, we’re committed to creating unique experiences like Illumination Park to enhance the quality of life of our community.”

The exhibit is “magnificent from day to night,” according to a press release from Broadway at the Beach. The shopping and entertainment center said the art display will include “Electric Dandelions” with light displays that will mimic fireworks; “Cloud Swings” that change colors while the guests swing below; and “Evanescent,” giant glowing orbs that change colors.

Work by local artist Jim Swaim also will be featured in the exhibit with a colorful crab sculpture that is meant to represent environmental preservation, Broadway at the Beach said.

“At The Hangout, we create experiences that bring generations together and art is a big part of that. We’ve gathered an assortment of unique art installations curated especially for the Myrtle Beach location. We like to make sure our visitors aren’t just observers — they become participants in the fun,” The Hangout’s owner Shaul Zislin said in a statement. “Illumination Park is an immersive experience that will also bring generations together by providing people a place where excitement and adventure await.”

The Hangout and “Illumination” come to Broadway at the Beach as the shopping and entertainment center has undergone some major changes in recent years. The last two night clubs at Broadway, Oz and Malibu’s Surf Bar, closed permanently in 2020. In November 2021, Señor Frogs started closing earlier and no longer transformed into a dance club on weekend nights.

A year later the Wonders Theatre returned to Broadway at the Beach in a new venue, the former Oz night club, after a two-year hiatus. Soon, The Hangout, a massive restaurant and bar that will offer live music and requires nearly 300 employees to operate, will open as well.

The “Illumination” exhibit is just the first step in the expansion of art displays in the Key West Village area at Broadway at the Beach. In the coming months, permanent murals will be painted on the buildings, and the shopping center said additional art might be added later in the summer to Illumination Park.

Future expansions of the Key West Village are planned, too, including new “specialty retail concepts” that have not yet been announced.

The area where Key West Village is located once contained the AMC Classic Broadway 16 movie theater, Dragon’s Lair Fantasy Mini-Golf, Pavilion Park East and MagiQuest. They were all demolished by late 2019.

This story was originally published May 26, 2022 5:00 AM.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.