Divorce Attorney in Sullivan's Island SC

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If there were one universal truth" it would be that every family is different. We all have our own set of challenges to face and changes to go through. Sometimes" those changes are happy" like when a new baby is born. Other times" these changes involve uncertainty and loss" like in the event of a divorce.

If you are having to go through the pain of divorce" deal with a complicated custody issue" or are handling a different family-related legal matter" you might need help. At Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC" we understand that family issues are hard. Many of the family law clients that we work for have big questions about the future" leaving them over-stressed and full of worry. They are concerned about their children" their marriage" or both. They are wrestling with uncertainty and anxiety" having been served confusing documents that don't make sense. Sound familiar? A family law attorney in Sullivan's Island" SC" can help" whether you need a level-headed moderator or a trusted advocate in the courtroom.

At Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC" we have decades of combined experience serving the needs of families" from divorce proceedings to family formation issues. Our team is fiercely committed to our clients" and with a dedicated focus" stays up-to-date on the nuanced world of family law in Sullivan's Island. If you're looking for personal attention" unbiased representation" and a responsive family law attorney" look no further than our law firm.

Estate Planning Law Sullivan's Island, SC

If you're unsure of whether you need a family law lawyers in Sullivan's Island" ask yourself these questions:

  • Are you getting married?
  • Are you thinking about divorce?
  • Has your spouse served you with legal papers?
  • Are your kids not receiving the support that they are entitled to?

If you answered "yes" to any of the questions above" know that we are here to help you figure out your next steps. With CDH Law Firm by your side" you can have the confidence to face even the most difficult family law issues. All of our attorneys have years of experience" are incredibly responsive" and fight for your family's rights. We are happy to take as much time as you need to answer questions and help put your mind at ease for whatever lies ahead.

 Estate Planning Attorney Sullivan's Island, SC

Our firm specializes in a wide range of family law cases" including:

  • Divorce
  • Child Custody
  • Alimony
  • Adoptions
  • Child Support
  • Mediation
  • Property Division
  • More

If you have been left to manage a foreign family law situation" it's time to call Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC. We will sit down with you for an hour at absolutely no cost - because we understand what you're going through and know that you need answers" not another bill to pay.

To help provide you with a basic understanding of family law" keep reading for in-depth explanations on our areas of expertise.

The-Cobb-Dill-Hammett-Difference

Divorce lawyer in
Sullivan's Island" SC.

At Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC" we know all-too-well that a "one size fits all" approach isn't going to work very well for your unique situation. That's why we approach each divorce case from a personalized standpoint - something that we feel like each of our clients deserves.

 Estate Planning Lawyer Sullivan's Island, SC
Our goal is to help solve your family law issues and focus on your needs when your divorce is finalized. We will help develop a strategy for:
  • Meeting your post-divorce needs and objectives
  • Dividing marital property for maximum benefit
  • Maximizing time spent with your child as part of your divorce's parenting plan
  • Strengthen your role as a decision-maker for your child
  • Navigating your divorce proceedings and minimizing financial and emotional costs

By working together" our divorce law firm will help you rebuild your life and secure a better future for your family.

Divorces in South Carolina
- Different Than Other States

Unlike divorce law in other states" South Carolina divorce law doesn't allow spouses to receive an instant no-fault divorce. One or both spouses in the marriage must establish a legally acceptable reason for a divorce to happen. Grounds for a divorce in Sullivan's Island" SC include:

  • Desertion
  • Physical Cruelty
  • Habitual Drunkenness
  • Separation for One Year or More
  • Adultery
 Divorce Attorney Sullivan's Island, SC

If you or your spouse do not have the necessary grounds for divorce in Sullivan's Island" our family law firm can file a Separate Maintenance and Support action. This step lets the court order child custody" alimony" and marital bills until you can file for your divorce. During this period" Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC gathers pertinent info on your spouse's character and assets that can strengthen your case" should it be necessary.

Common Issues Associated
with Divorces in Sullivan's Island

A divorce in Sullivan's Island means more than the end of a marriage. It involves dividing the parties' debts and assets" determines child support and custody parameters" and can establish alimony. At Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC" many of our clients are able to reach agreements with their spouse to resolve these issues. Reaching an agreement lets both parties customize the terms of their divorce to conserve resources" avoid trial" and meet the family's needs.

Sometimes" however" two spouses cannot or will not come to terms with an agreement. In these situations" a trial is possible" and litigation is necessary. Our family law attorneys in Sullivan's Island" SC. are highly experienced litigators and are well-equipped to handle any disputes revealed in the conference or courtroom.

Common divorce issues include:

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1.

Child Custody and Visitation

One of the most heart-wrenching" difficult decisions for parents going through a divorce is resolving child custody and visitation issues. Child custody refers to how much time each parent will spend with their child" and whether they can make decisions for them. According to South Carolina law" child custody and visitation time are based on what is best for the child.

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2.

Child Support

Like other U.S states" a formula is used in South Carolina to determine how much child support a person must pay. This formula recommends the amount of child support based on factors like how much income the parents make" the cost of childcare" and the obligation to support children from other relationships.

 Law Firm Sullivan's Island, SC
3.

Alimony

In South Carolina" there is no formula to determine how much alimony a person must pay. However" courts consider several factors when deciding if alimony is needed" how much alimony should be paid" and how long a spouse must pay it. Those factors include each spouse's ability and need to pay alimony" how long the marriage lasted" and any marital misconduct that occurred. To make matters more confusing" there are different alimony types" including lump sum" rehabilitative" and reimbursement.

 Attorney Sullivan's Island, SC
4.

Distribution of Property

In South Carolina" marital property is the property that each spouse amasses from the date of the wedding to the time a spouse files for divorce. That property can often include marital debt. In a South Carolina divorce" the courts will order an equitable division of property" meaning "fair" under all circumstances but not necessarily equal.

 Divorce Lawyer Sullivan's Island, SC

Understanding Child Custody in Sullivan's Island" SC

As mentioned above" decisions that involve child custody and visitation can be contentious for parents" both emotionally and legally. As experienced" empathetic divorce lawyers" we understand how difficult this process can be. When we work with clients going through child custody battles" we always make it a point to be with them through the ups and downs" to help them stay centered. Whether you are the husband or wife in your divorce" we share a common goal: finding an effective way to support your children and assure their wellbeing.

In South Carolina" child custody is a loaded term. In the most general definition" child custody determines when each parent is responsible for the physical care of the child and how much authority each parent has" to make decisions in their child's life.

No two child custody cases are the same" but a negotiated custody arrangement is usually preferred in the judge's eyes" as each parent has input in the process. If the parents cannot come to an amicable resolution" their fate is left in the hands of a Family Court Judge in South Carolina. The focus of child custody law is always on what is in the "best interests" of the child. What the judge determines to be the "best interests" changes depending on the judge.

There are different variations of "custody" in South Carolina (or custody arrangements)" each with varying degrees of authority. When you consult with our family law attorneys at Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC" we will go over the child custody process in detail and touch on each distinction to eliminate any confusion you have.

  • Help develop cooperative solutions to disputes or mediate when needed
  • Create an equitable parenting plan
  • Discuss the implications of the different forms of joint and sole custody
  • Problems related to child support
  • Modify court orders if you or your child's circumstances change
  • Enforcement of visitation and custody agreements
  • Much more
Many of the family law clients that walk into our office have big questions that are leaving them full of stress and worry. <

Many of the family law clients that walk into our office have big questions that are leaving them full of stress and worry.

Free Consultation
Estate Planning Law Sullivan's Island, SC

Understanding Child Support
in Sullivan's Island" SC

When children are involved in divorce cases" child support is often ordered. Several factors can impact whether child support is ordered" like the income-earning potential of the child's parents" any custody arrangements that are created" and what needs the child may have.

At Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC" we have years of experience with child support issues relating to:

  • Cases where child support is needed for stay-at-home parents
  • Modifications and enforcement of child support mandates
  • Resolving support and custody disputes
  • Mediation arrangements to reach an agreement on child support. Compared to litigation" going
  • the mediated route often means less stress and is more cost-effective than trial.

When you trust our family law firm in Sullivan's Island for representation" we can help calculate an estimate of how much child support you or your spouse may be ordered to pay. We can also perform a needs-based analysis in cases that involve large amounts of income. At the end of the day" our goal is to make this frustrating process as stress-free as possible for you" so that you can focus on living life and caring for your child.

Understanding Alimony in
Sullivan's Island" SC

Alimony (sometimes called spousal support or maintenance) is ordered by the court or negotiated between parties. This kind of spousal support has many factors" like the income of both spouses" how long they were married" and the age of each spouse. Like child custody and child support" trusted legal guidance is strongly recommended if you are facing potential alimony payments. Our family law attorneys will help you reach amicable arrangements for fair and appropriate alimony payments.

At Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC" your family law attorney in Sullivan's Island" SC" will help protect your interests and rights regarding:

 Estate Planning Attorney Sullivan's Island, SC
  • Alimony and business assets
  • Permanent or long-term alimony
  • Significant alimony in high-asset divorces
  • Modifications to alimony arrangements when you or your spouse's circumstances change
  • Enforcement of spousal support mandates" when needed

Understanding Division of
Property in Sullivan's Island" SC

When there are no children" marital property" or issues of alimony" divorces often proceed smoothly between amicable spouses. However" most divorces in South Carolina are much more complex. Typically" divorce involves a union between spouses that lasts for years and involves substantial marital property. This property can be personal property" real estate" family businesses" debts" out-of-state property" debts" bank accounts" and more.

In these nuanced situations" the applicable parties need assistance dividing their property. This help most often comes from seasoned family law attorneys like Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC.

When it comes to distribution of property" certain types of properties that are controversial" even under the property division rules in South Carolina. South Carolina is an equitable distribution state" meaning that marital property is divided equitably but not always equally.

If you are going through a divorce" it's important that you are aware of the following assets and the common issues their division presents:

 Estate Planning Lawyer Sullivan's Island, SC
Pensions

Pensions:

Generally" pensions are the second-largest asset in a marriage. When there are sufficient alternative income sources to compensate the non-pension holder" South Carolina divorce courts may leave the pension rights with the spouse who earned it" with future distribution available. Otherwise" a divorce court may enter a Qualified Domestic Relations Order requiring the pension administrator to pay both the former spouse and worker.

Family Home

Family Home:

The family home" or the primary residential property owned by the divorcing couple" is usually considered a marriage's biggest asset. Dividing this kind of property can be complex and frustrating" especially when there are kids involved.

Many divorcing couples have a hard time reaching an agreement on property division. Because the division of property depends on the complexity of you or your spouse's assets and liabilities" it is crucial to consult with an experienced family law attorney to provide guidance.

Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

'Do not rezone that golf course'; citizens say facility needed; change may also threaten airport

Several individuals appeared before Orangeburg County Council requesting a halt to the rezoning of the Holly Hill Golf Club property that would allow the development of a single-family subdivision."I beg you please do the right thing and do not rezone that golf course," Co-chair of Planning and Zoning for Holly Hill Justin VanBogart told Orangeburg County Council during its regularly scheduled June 6 meeting. "It is in the public interest to keep one of the very few recreational things we have in this town."...

Several individuals appeared before Orangeburg County Council requesting a halt to the rezoning of the Holly Hill Golf Club property that would allow the development of a single-family subdivision.

"I beg you please do the right thing and do not rezone that golf course," Co-chair of Planning and Zoning for Holly Hill Justin VanBogart told Orangeburg County Council during its regularly scheduled June 6 meeting. "It is in the public interest to keep one of the very few recreational things we have in this town."

Council was scheduled to give second reading to rezone the golf club property from forest agriculture to residential general.

American Star Development SC, LLC of Sullivan's Island has requested the two parcels making up the Holly Hill Golf Club at 9159 Old State Road be rezoned.

The parcels are a combined 93.59 acres. The property is about one mile southeast of the Town of Holly Hill.

ASC has said the company has no specific plans for the property at the moment. It is exploring zoning opportunities to better determine future development plans.

County planning officials say the owner has expressed his intentions to close the golf course.

Several attempts to reach the owner of the property, as listed on the rezoning application, have been unsuccessful.

County attorney D'Anne Haydel said the South Carolina Aeronautics Commission notified the county it has two objections with rezoning the property, specially due to safety and noise concerns.

Haydel noted the SCAC is a governmental entity and needs a hearing.

"There is a statute that indicates we need to get back with the Aeronautics Commission within 30 days with a line-by-line response to why it is safe and why it won't be noisy," Haydel said.

In light of the new information, council unanimously voted to table the matter and to send it back to the County Planning Commission for further study on the SCAC concerns.

Prior to the council's vote, VanBogart noted with the number of housing developments planned -- the town is going to grow from 700 homes to 3,000 homes in the next two years -- there will be a need to have recreational opportunities for residents coming into the area.

"We want to keep our golf course," VanBogart said. "It is very much integral to our town."

VanBogart said while the town owned the golf course for years, it has been sold to a private developer who has "plans to tear it (golf course) down and make it homes."

"I am all about private property rights," VanBogart said, but noted there has not been full disclosure from the property's ownership about intentions for the property. "We were all caught completely blindsided."

John Hill, speaking on behalf of his son, John Paul, who keeps a plane at the airport, says the airport is a "gem."

"I think there is hardly any left in South Carolina that are a grass strip and private," Hill said. "This is going back to the past in America when pilots flew out of grass strips."

Hill said the airport is a great educational tool for young generations and has flight opportunities for school-aged children as well as instruction on airplane mechanics as part of the national Experimental Aircraft Association.

"It is a page of history that is going to disappear," Hill said. "I think it is a unique distinction. That airport can lead to so many things."

Robert Gootman also expressed his support of the Holly Hill Airport.

"There are too many airports that close and Holly Hill has a very unique asset in that airport and it will grow along with the community," Gootman said, noting the airport can be used in cases of emergency, training of pilots and recreational uses. "If that golf course turns into a housing development, that airport will be shut down. It will be too dangerous to land airplanes there because you will have houses right there in front of the flight path."

Ken Mackey also has an airplane at the Holly Hill airport.

"It will close the airport," Mackey said. "You can't have airplanes coming 200 feet over the house."

Mackey said subdivisions alongside the airport are possible.

He has contacted the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association national group, which is putting a package together to possibly turn the airport into an air park where houses alongside the airport have hangars.

"There are no hangars available from Holly Hill to the coast to hangar your aircraft," Mackey said. "There is demand there for this type of development ... and keep the asset as an airport."

New legislation could increase enforcement of state ethics fines

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - This month, the state ethics commission updated its list of debtors which includes elected officials and candidates on the hook for late or missing filings, misuse of campaign funds and more.It’s about 25 pages long, listing people who owe $100 to hundreds of thousands, totaling $2.6 million.That’s about the same as when ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - This month, the state ethics commission updated its list of debtors which includes elected officials and candidates on the hook for late or missing filings, misuse of campaign funds and more.

It’s about 25 pages long, listing people who owe $100 to hundreds of thousands, totaling $2.6 million.

That’s about the same as when Live 5 Investigates reported on the debtors three years ago.

Ethics Commission Debtor’s list continues to grow

The latest to be added from the Lowcountry area are Angela McClary-Rush, a board member for Williamsburg Council Schools, Chris Lovelace, a former Colleton County Sheriff candidate and Timothy Reese, a council member on Sullivan’s Island.

Many remain on that list months and years after being added because getting them to pay up, doesn’t always pay off for the South Carolina Ethics Commission.

That’s because the state agency lacks the enforcement it needs, according to Sen. Greg Hembree (R-District 28).

“When you don’t have that ability to enforce the law. Then you really undermine the entire integrity of the system,” he said.

The Commission is charged with keeping politicians honest by enforcing state elections laws.

“We were way ahead of the country back in when we first passed them. We were like the lead, they had the best ethics laws in the country for a long time, but other states have caught us and now have passed us,” Hembree said. “For someone who just wants to thumb their nose at the law they can.”

Live 5 spoke with former Charleston County District 20 Constituent School Board chairman Tony Lewis in 2018 to ask about $61,210 owed to the ethics commission. Then he said he didn’t have a problem with being held accountable.

He’s currently listed as owing $60,955, making about a $300 difference.

When Live 5 Investigates followed up, he did say he had been making some payments until the pandemic hit.

But had a different tone, calling the fines “hellacious price tag” in response to a question if he would resume payments.

Lewis no longer holds his position on the board.

Candidates in smaller races report less help and resources, but higher fines

Henry Copeland ran for Charleston County School board in 2012 and ended up owing the ethics commission $7,500 dollars. What began as an initial late fee of $100, ended up snowballing with daily late fees.

He’s now on a payment plan from the Department of Revenue.

“It was a shock in the sense that was far more than I ever spent on the election,” he said. “I think it was a very stiff fine considering the fact we were talking about a missing a filing deadline and we may be talking about reporting maybe $2,000 worth of campaign contributions, but the law is the law. But there ought to be some opportunity in which to rectify a situation that had apparently gone to the other extreme.”

Running a smaller campaign, Copeland recalls little to no support available to him from the state.

We were also able to get in contact with Chris Lovelace who according to the ethics commission owes $31,100 in fines for his 2016 run for Colleton County Sheriff.

Lovelace was just added to the list this past month.

The ethics commission reports he missed several filing deadlines and used campaign funds for personal reasons including gas station, restaurant, and clothing store charges.

Lovelace denies wrongdoing and argues health issues put him at a disadvantage.

“All the campaign funds are accounted for. It’s just that, they weren’t reported on time, at the time frame they wanted. And again, I take responsibility for that. It’s nobody else’s responsibility but mine. But I think the $30,000 is excessive,” he said. “As far as the Ethics Commission, dealing with them, it’s left a sour taste in my mouth.”

Lovelace says he ran because he saw corruption within the department and wanted to do something positive for his community.

He’s currently appealing his case.

Lewis also complained that he wasn’t aware of procedure, and it wasn’t fair to charge him for something he didn’t know about.

“The paperwork is so discouraging from that standpoint that I can easily see where an average person would hesitate to get involved. It places doubt on my desire to run for political office again, " Copeland said.

Banned from holding office

Legislation is in the works that would prevent Copeland and all the others named on the list from running from office again, at least as long as they owe money.

Sen. Hembree of the Peedee area introduced Senate Bill 991 that would prevent candidates with outstanding debts from doing so.

“There was one that we had in Horry County some years ago with a high profile elected official who happened to be a friend of mine, you know, but this person just for whatever reason we’re just steadfastly refused to pay those funds and they got into the tens of thousands of dollars,” Hembree said. “This person continued to serve continue to run for election and continue to get reelected so and still no payment of fine. So I was that was how I became aware of the problem.”

The bill did make it to a subcommittee but ultimately did not pass this legislative session.

Hembree says the bill wasn’t fully ready but he’s hopeful they’ll hit the ground running next year.

“I think that if you want a system, that’s truly accountable. They’re going to have to be more people at the Ethics Commission,” Copeland said. “But they’re going to have to have more of an eye on how to catch the items that can be corrected and how to catch the items that are an abuse of the system, and how to tell the difference between the two.”

The Ethics Commission receives funds from the legislature, but the $2.6 million owed is intended to help keep the department operating.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

What is the record high temperature for each South Carolina county?

HORRY COUNTY, S.C. (WBTW) — If you can’t take the heat…you might want to crank up your AC.Every South Carolina county has reached at least 105 degrees since agencies began tracking temperatures, according to information from the South Carolina State Climatology Office. The state high was reached on June 29, 2021, at 113 degrees in Columbia.The state’s lowest recorded temperature was -19 d...

HORRY COUNTY, S.C. (WBTW) — If you can’t take the heat…you might want to crank up your AC.

Every South Carolina county has reached at least 105 degrees since agencies began tracking temperatures, according to information from the South Carolina State Climatology Office. The state high was reached on June 29, 2021, at 113 degrees in Columbia.

The state’s lowest recorded temperature was -19 degrees, recorded on Jan. 21, 1985, in Caesars Head.

High temperatures are expected to continue in South Carolina this week following a heat advisory issued on Tuesday.

Wednesday, temperatures were expected to reach a high in the lower 90s, with weather cooling to the lower 70s at night in Horry County, according to the National Weather Service. The heat index could possibly reach 100 to 105 degrees on Friday in southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina.

On the cooler side, South Carolina’s 24-hour snowfall record was reached on Feb. 9-10, 1973, in Rimini, with 24 inches, according to the National Centers for Environmental Information. The deepest snow was recorded on Feb. 18, 1969, in Ceasars Head, at 29 inches.

The most rain was on Sept. 16, 1999, in Myrtle Beach, at 14.8 inches within 24 hours. Jocasee set a record for the most rain in a year in 2018, at 123.45 inches.

Here are the lowest temperatures recorded in each South Carolina county, according to the South Carolina State Climatology Office:

Abbeville County

Location: Calhoun Falls

Temperature: 111 degrees

Date: Sept. 8, 1925

Aiken County

Location: Aiken

Temperature: 109 degrees

Date: Aug. 22, 1983

Allendale County

Location: Allendale

Temperature: 106 degrees

Date: Aug. 22, 1983

Anderson County

Location: Anderson

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: July 29, 1952

Bamberg County

Location: Bamberg

Temperature: 109 degrees

Date: July 24, 1952

Barnwell County

Location: Blackville

Temperature: 111 degrees

Date: Sept. 4, 1925

Beaufort County

Location: Yemasse

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: June 3, 1985

Berkeley County

Location: Jamestown

Temperature: 105 degrees

Date: Aug. 11, 2007

Calhoun County

Location: St. Matthews

Temperature: 105 degrees

Date: July 27, 1914

Charleston County

Location: Sullivans Island

Temperature: 105 degrees

Date: June 26, 1952

Cherokee County

Location: Ninety Nine Islands

Temperature: 106 degrees

Date: Aug. 21, 1983

Chester County

Location: Chester

Temperature: 106 degrees

Date: Aug. 31, 1983

Chesterfield County

Location: Cheraw

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: July 19, 1986

Clarendon County

Location: Manning

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: Aug. 22, 1983

Colleton County

Location: Walterboro

Temperature: 107 degrees

Date: Aug. 17, 1954

Darlington County

Location: Darlington

Temperature: 109 degrees

Date: Sept. 4, 1925

Dillon County

Location: Dillon

Temperature: 106 degrees

Date: Aug. 22, 1983

Dorchester County

Location: Summerville

Temperature: 107 degrees

Date: Sept. 21, 1925

Edgefield County

Location: Johnston

Temperature: 110 degrees

Date: Aug. 11, 2007

Fairfield County

Location: Winsboro

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: July 22, 1926

Florence County

Location: Florence

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: June 27, 1954

Georgetown County

Location: Georgetown

Temperature: 106 degrees

Date: June 30, 1990

Greenville County

Location: Hunts Bridge

Temperature: 105 degrees

Date: Aug. 10, 2007

Greenwood County

Location: Greenwood

Temperature: 109 degrees

Date: July 19, 1913

Hampton County

Location: Hampton

Temperature: 107 degrees

Date: July 13, 1980

Horry County

Location: Loris

Temperature: 107 degrees

Date: June 27, 1952

Jasper County

Location: Ridgeland

Temperature: 107 degrees

Date: June 27, 1950

Kershaw County

Location: Camden

Temperature: 111 degrees

Date: June 28, 1954

Lancaster County

Location: Kershaw

Temperature: 107 degrees

Date: July 27, 1926

Laurens County

Location: Laurens

Temperature: 110 degrees

Date: June 22, 1925

Lee County

Location: Bishopville

Temperature: 107 degrees

Date: July 27, 1940

Lexington County

Location: Columbia Metropolitan Airport

Temperature: 109 degrees

Date: June 28, 2012

Marion County

Location: Marion

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: June 27, 1954

Marlboro County

Location: McColl

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: Aug. 9, 2007

McCormick County

Location: Clarkhill

Temperature: 109 degrees

Date: July 29, 1987

Newberry County

Location: Little Mountain

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: July 21, 1952

Oconee County

Location: Walhalla

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: Sept. 7, 1925

Orangeburg County

Location: Orangeburg

Temperature: 106 degrees

Date: Aug. 2, 1999

Pickens County

Location: Pickens

Temperature: 105 degrees

Date: Aug. 21, 1983

Richland County

Location: USC Columbia

Temperature: 113 degrees

Date: June 29, 2012

Saluda County

Location: Saluda

Temperature: 109 degrees

Date: Sept. 1, 1912

Spartanburg County

Location: Spartanburg

Temperature: 106 degrees

Date: July 20, 1986

Sumter County

Location: Wedgefield

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: Sept. 4, 1925

Union County

Location: Santuck

Temperature: 110 degrees

Date: Sept. 4, 1925

Williamsburg County

Location: Kingstree

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: July 20, 1986

York County

Location: Winthrop University

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: July 12, 1930

Count on News13 for all your latest weather coverage.

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Town leaders, advocates say cutting of Sullivan’s Island Maritime Forest likely illegal

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Sullivan’s Island leaders say they’re hiring an attorney to look at ways to overturn a plan that could lead to large portions of the island’s maritime forest being cut down. The vote to hire Attorney William Wilkin came just days after a portion of the forest was potentially illegally cut near Station 26 on the island.Drone footage provided by SI4ALL shows a section roughly the width of a house was cleared. The clearing is raising concerns for residents while town official...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Sullivan’s Island leaders say they’re hiring an attorney to look at ways to overturn a plan that could lead to large portions of the island’s maritime forest being cut down. The vote to hire Attorney William Wilkin came just days after a portion of the forest was potentially illegally cut near Station 26 on the island.

Drone footage provided by SI4ALL shows a section roughly the width of a house was cleared. The clearing is raising concerns for residents while town officials say they are investigating to determine if the cutting was illegal.

“We were heartbroken and devastated to see the extent of the cutting,” says Karen Byko, President of SI4ALL.

The clearing has town leaders and residents including Byko scrambling to stop the chop of the island’s accreted forest the say provides protection from storms and flooding while offering a home for native wildlife.

“Concern is that we are devastating the very thing that is protecting us and it provides a home to our wildlife partners,” says Byko.

A majority of the cutting happened behind a house near Station 26 on Atlantic Avenue. Zillow records show the house was listed for sale on February 10th, around the time the cutting was believed to have happened, for $2.9 million. The house was then taken off the market five days later on February 15th after concerns over the cutting were raised at a town council meeting.

News 2 went to the home in front of the cutting to ask the owners if they knew anything about the cutting, a housekeeper was the only person home at the time and declined to answer questions.

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control says they haven’t received any tree cutting permits from either the Town of Sullivan’s Island or private residents. The agency says they recommended more discussion at the local level late last year before permitting any clearing of vegetation.

Town councilmembers Gary Visser and Scott Millimet called the cutting illegal and disheartening to see.

“The disregard for our community that they are a part of,” says Visser. Millimet called the act “extremely selfish.”

Sullivan’s Island Mayor Pat O’neil says the town is conducting a serious and thorough investigation into the cutting to identify those responsible and hold them accountable. Town officials are hopeful stricter penalties for cutting trees will be adopted by Town Council moving forward.

“If somebody says you’re going to have to wear an orange jumpsuit for 30 days, that might be a bigger deterrent,” says Millimet.

“We hope that they will prosecute to the fullest extent of the law,” says Byko.

The Army Corps of Engineers says they have not been contacted to investigate the cutting. Town officials say they will continue to investigate the incident.

Loggerheads Continue To Lay Eggs By The Dozen

By Mary Pringle for The Island Eye NewsAt last, our loggerhead turtles have started to lay their eggs. As of May 26 the combined number of eggs laid is just over 550 on the Isle of Palms and 271 on Sullivan’s Island. The first of our six nests was laid on May 16 at 5th Avenue on the Isle of Palms and was discovered by Turtle Team members Jane Solomon, Peggy Klimecki and Trisha Hoff. It was laid at the high tide line in the middle of the vehicular access path at 5th Avenue. For those reasons, the 123 eggs were moved higher onto a...

By Mary Pringle for The Island Eye News

At last, our loggerhead turtles have started to lay their eggs. As of May 26 the combined number of eggs laid is just over 550 on the Isle of Palms and 271 on Sullivan’s Island. The first of our six nests was laid on May 16 at 5th Avenue on the Isle of Palms and was discovered by Turtle Team members Jane Solomon, Peggy Klimecki and Trisha Hoff. It was laid at the high tide line in the middle of the vehicular access path at 5th Avenue. For those reasons, the 123 eggs were moved higher onto a nearby dune where they would not be destroyed by the tide or emergency vehicles. Subsequent nests on the Isle of Palms have been laid at the 5A Access Path, the 9A Access Path and in Dewees Inlet near the 17 tee of the Links Golf Course. This fourth IOP nest is now incubating near the Property Owners’ Beach House in Wild Dunes. On Sullivan’s Island, the first nest was laid very close to the Breach Inlet Bridge at the Hunley Memorial Park. This is not even in the area where our volunteers patrol, but others reported seeing the tracks there on May 20. Those eggs were taken to Station 26 to be relocated.

This was an unusually large clutch of 156 eggs. The average number they lay is around 120 eggs. The second SI nest of the season was found near Station 15 not far from Fort Moultrie by Raye Ann Osborne and Joanne Staton on May 24. It is now incubating just northeast of the Station 16 Access Path. In South Carolina, the first nest of the season was laid at Lighthouse Island in the Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge where more loggerheads nest than anywhere north of Jacksonville, Florida.

As of May 26 there were 923 nests in our state. We are off to a good start and are looking forward to having a very good season. We are also protecting most of our nests from coyote predation with heavy plastic screening.

Here are season reminders that we would like everyone to be aware of to have a safe beach for our loggerheads in 2022:

• Lights Out at Dusk. Any lights that can be seen from the beach should be turned off from dusk to dawn between May 1 and Oct. 31. This is the law on both islands.

• Fill in Holes. Any hole on the beach can trap small hatchlings and also large nesting females.

• Turn off flashlights & don’t use flash photography. If you see a nesting turtle on the beach, stay back at least 50 feet and do not disturb her.

Report any stranded turtles, dead or alive, to (843) 697-8733 or (843) 886-6522. If it has orange paint on it, it has been documented and is awaiting burial. Follow the season at bergwerfgraphics.com or join us on Facebook at Island Turtle Team IOP & SI South Carolina.

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