Divorce Attorney in West Ashley SC

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If there were one universal truth" it would be that every family is different. We all have our own set of challenges to face and changes to go through. Sometimes" those changes are happy" like when a new baby is born. Other times" these changes involve uncertainty and loss" like in the event of a divorce.

If you are having to go through the pain of divorce" deal with a complicated custody issue" or are handling a different family-related legal matter" you might need help. At Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC" we understand that family issues are hard. Many of the family law clients that we work for have big questions about the future" leaving them over-stressed and full of worry. They are concerned about their children" their marriage" or both. They are wrestling with uncertainty and anxiety" having been served confusing documents that don't make sense. Sound familiar? A family law attorney in West Ashley" SC" can help" whether you need a level-headed moderator or a trusted advocate in the courtroom.

At Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC" we have decades of combined experience serving the needs of families" from divorce proceedings to family formation issues. Our team is fiercely committed to our clients" and with a dedicated focus" stays up-to-date on the nuanced world of family law in West Ashley. If you're looking for personal attention" unbiased representation" and a responsive family law attorney" look no further than our law firm.

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If you're unsure of whether you need a family law lawyers in West Ashley" ask yourself these questions:

  • Are you getting married?
  • Are you thinking about divorce?
  • Has your spouse served you with legal papers?
  • Are your kids not receiving the support that they are entitled to?

If you answered "yes" to any of the questions above" know that we are here to help you figure out your next steps. With CDH Law Firm by your side" you can have the confidence to face even the most difficult family law issues. All of our attorneys have years of experience" are incredibly responsive" and fight for your family's rights. We are happy to take as much time as you need to answer questions and help put your mind at ease for whatever lies ahead.

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Our firm specializes in a wide range of family law cases" including:

  • Divorce
  • Child Custody
  • Alimony
  • Adoptions
  • Child Support
  • Mediation
  • Property Division
  • More

If you have been left to manage a foreign family law situation" it's time to call Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC. We will sit down with you for an hour at absolutely no cost - because we understand what you're going through and know that you need answers" not another bill to pay.

To help provide you with a basic understanding of family law" keep reading for in-depth explanations on our areas of expertise.

The-Cobb-Dill-Hammett-Difference

Divorce lawyer in
West Ashley" SC.

At Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC" we know all-too-well that a "one size fits all" approach isn't going to work very well for your unique situation. That's why we approach each divorce case from a personalized standpoint - something that we feel like each of our clients deserves.

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Our goal is to help solve your family law issues and focus on your needs when your divorce is finalized. We will help develop a strategy for:
  • Meeting your post-divorce needs and objectives
  • Dividing marital property for maximum benefit
  • Maximizing time spent with your child as part of your divorce's parenting plan
  • Strengthen your role as a decision-maker for your child
  • Navigating your divorce proceedings and minimizing financial and emotional costs

By working together" our divorce law firm will help you rebuild your life and secure a better future for your family.

Divorces in South Carolina
- Different Than Other States

Unlike divorce law in other states" South Carolina divorce law doesn't allow spouses to receive an instant no-fault divorce. One or both spouses in the marriage must establish a legally acceptable reason for a divorce to happen. Grounds for a divorce in West Ashley" SC include:

  • Desertion
  • Physical Cruelty
  • Habitual Drunkenness
  • Separation for One Year or More
  • Adultery
 Divorce Attorney West Ashley, SC

If you or your spouse do not have the necessary grounds for divorce in West Ashley" our family law firm can file a Separate Maintenance and Support action. This step lets the court order child custody" alimony" and marital bills until you can file for your divorce. During this period" Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC gathers pertinent info on your spouse's character and assets that can strengthen your case" should it be necessary.

Common Issues Associated
with Divorces in West Ashley

A divorce in West Ashley means more than the end of a marriage. It involves dividing the parties' debts and assets" determines child support and custody parameters" and can establish alimony. At Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC" many of our clients are able to reach agreements with their spouse to resolve these issues. Reaching an agreement lets both parties customize the terms of their divorce to conserve resources" avoid trial" and meet the family's needs.

Sometimes" however" two spouses cannot or will not come to terms with an agreement. In these situations" a trial is possible" and litigation is necessary. Our family law attorneys in West Ashley" SC. are highly experienced litigators and are well-equipped to handle any disputes revealed in the conference or courtroom.

Common divorce issues include:

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1.

Child Custody and Visitation

One of the most heart-wrenching" difficult decisions for parents going through a divorce is resolving child custody and visitation issues. Child custody refers to how much time each parent will spend with their child" and whether they can make decisions for them. According to South Carolina law" child custody and visitation time are based on what is best for the child.

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2.

Child Support

Like other U.S states" a formula is used in South Carolina to determine how much child support a person must pay. This formula recommends the amount of child support based on factors like how much income the parents make" the cost of childcare" and the obligation to support children from other relationships.

 Law Firm West Ashley, SC
3.

Alimony

In South Carolina" there is no formula to determine how much alimony a person must pay. However" courts consider several factors when deciding if alimony is needed" how much alimony should be paid" and how long a spouse must pay it. Those factors include each spouse's ability and need to pay alimony" how long the marriage lasted" and any marital misconduct that occurred. To make matters more confusing" there are different alimony types" including lump sum" rehabilitative" and reimbursement.

 Attorney West Ashley, SC
4.

Distribution of Property

In South Carolina" marital property is the property that each spouse amasses from the date of the wedding to the time a spouse files for divorce. That property can often include marital debt. In a South Carolina divorce" the courts will order an equitable division of property" meaning "fair" under all circumstances but not necessarily equal.

 Divorce Lawyer West Ashley, SC

Understanding Child Custody in West Ashley" SC

As mentioned above" decisions that involve child custody and visitation can be contentious for parents" both emotionally and legally. As experienced" empathetic divorce lawyers" we understand how difficult this process can be. When we work with clients going through child custody battles" we always make it a point to be with them through the ups and downs" to help them stay centered. Whether you are the husband or wife in your divorce" we share a common goal: finding an effective way to support your children and assure their wellbeing.

In South Carolina" child custody is a loaded term. In the most general definition" child custody determines when each parent is responsible for the physical care of the child and how much authority each parent has" to make decisions in their child's life.

No two child custody cases are the same" but a negotiated custody arrangement is usually preferred in the judge's eyes" as each parent has input in the process. If the parents cannot come to an amicable resolution" their fate is left in the hands of a Family Court Judge in South Carolina. The focus of child custody law is always on what is in the "best interests" of the child. What the judge determines to be the "best interests" changes depending on the judge.

There are different variations of "custody" in South Carolina (or custody arrangements)" each with varying degrees of authority. When you consult with our family law attorneys at Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC" we will go over the child custody process in detail and touch on each distinction to eliminate any confusion you have.

  • Help develop cooperative solutions to disputes or mediate when needed
  • Create an equitable parenting plan
  • Discuss the implications of the different forms of joint and sole custody
  • Problems related to child support
  • Modify court orders if you or your child's circumstances change
  • Enforcement of visitation and custody agreements
  • Much more
Many of the family law clients that walk into our office have big questions that are leaving them full of stress and worry. <

Many of the family law clients that walk into our office have big questions that are leaving them full of stress and worry.

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Estate Planning Law West Ashley, SC

Understanding Child Support
in West Ashley" SC

When children are involved in divorce cases" child support is often ordered. Several factors can impact whether child support is ordered" like the income-earning potential of the child's parents" any custody arrangements that are created" and what needs the child may have.

At Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC" we have years of experience with child support issues relating to:

  • Cases where child support is needed for stay-at-home parents
  • Modifications and enforcement of child support mandates
  • Resolving support and custody disputes
  • Mediation arrangements to reach an agreement on child support. Compared to litigation" going
  • the mediated route often means less stress and is more cost-effective than trial.

When you trust our family law firm in West Ashley for representation" we can help calculate an estimate of how much child support you or your spouse may be ordered to pay. We can also perform a needs-based analysis in cases that involve large amounts of income. At the end of the day" our goal is to make this frustrating process as stress-free as possible for you" so that you can focus on living life and caring for your child.

Understanding Alimony in
West Ashley" SC

Alimony (sometimes called spousal support or maintenance) is ordered by the court or negotiated between parties. This kind of spousal support has many factors" like the income of both spouses" how long they were married" and the age of each spouse. Like child custody and child support" trusted legal guidance is strongly recommended if you are facing potential alimony payments. Our family law attorneys will help you reach amicable arrangements for fair and appropriate alimony payments.

At Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC" your family law attorney in West Ashley" SC" will help protect your interests and rights regarding:

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  • Alimony and business assets
  • Permanent or long-term alimony
  • Significant alimony in high-asset divorces
  • Modifications to alimony arrangements when you or your spouse's circumstances change
  • Enforcement of spousal support mandates" when needed

Understanding Division of
Property in West Ashley" SC

When there are no children" marital property" or issues of alimony" divorces often proceed smoothly between amicable spouses. However" most divorces in South Carolina are much more complex. Typically" divorce involves a union between spouses that lasts for years and involves substantial marital property. This property can be personal property" real estate" family businesses" debts" out-of-state property" debts" bank accounts" and more.

In these nuanced situations" the applicable parties need assistance dividing their property. This help most often comes from seasoned family law attorneys like Cobb Dill & Hammett" LLC.

When it comes to distribution of property" certain types of properties that are controversial" even under the property division rules in South Carolina. South Carolina is an equitable distribution state" meaning that marital property is divided equitably but not always equally.

If you are going through a divorce" it's important that you are aware of the following assets and the common issues their division presents:

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Pensions

Pensions:

Generally" pensions are the second-largest asset in a marriage. When there are sufficient alternative income sources to compensate the non-pension holder" South Carolina divorce courts may leave the pension rights with the spouse who earned it" with future distribution available. Otherwise" a divorce court may enter a Qualified Domestic Relations Order requiring the pension administrator to pay both the former spouse and worker.

Family Home

Family Home:

The family home" or the primary residential property owned by the divorcing couple" is usually considered a marriage's biggest asset. Dividing this kind of property can be complex and frustrating" especially when there are kids involved.

Many divorcing couples have a hard time reaching an agreement on property division. Because the division of property depends on the complexity of you or your spouse's assets and liabilities" it is crucial to consult with an experienced family law attorney to provide guidance.

Latest News in West Ashley, SC

Dead vultures found in West Ashley positive for avian flu, cannot be removed

WEST ASHLEY, S.C. (WCBD) — South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) has confirmed that some dead vultures found in a West Ashley neighborhood tested positive for a highly pathogenic avian flu.Dore Carlo originally found dozens of the dead vultures near two retention ponds behind his home on May 7....

WEST ASHLEY, S.C. (WCBD) — South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) has confirmed that some dead vultures found in a West Ashley neighborhood tested positive for a highly pathogenic avian flu.

Dore Carlo originally found dozens of the dead vultures near two retention ponds behind his home on May 7.

“We had friends come over, who had a golf cart, and we took a ride back here and saw dozens of dead ones,” Carlo recalled.

He reported it to the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR), which took samples from the birds on May 10.

“DHEC advised me to get the word out best I could to keep children and pets away from the area,” Carlo said.

Health officials said avian flu can spread through any contact with the birds, as well as through their feathers or fecal material. However, the risk of people or pets contracting the virus is considered low.

“Anytime it does happen, that’s when we call it a novel flu strain – or novel infection – anytime it goes from animal host to human host,” said Jonathan Knoche, a DHEC public health physician.

Will Dillman, SCDNR assistant chief of wildlife, said direct sunlight and summer heat help kill the virus.

“As the weather heats up this should be less prevalent and run its course,” he said.

Almost a month after the dead vultures were first reported, Carlo said they are still losing two or three vultures a day, and more than 20 carcasses still sit in the neighborhood.

Now, he wants to know who will get rid of all the carcasses surrounding the retention ponds where people walk their dogs and children play.

“There’s other diseases I’m sure will come along from all these dead birds, not to mention they are bringing other animals around that would be feeding off of them,” said Carlo.

Both SCDNR and DHEC said there is nothing they can do to remove the dead birds.

“Moving those carcasses around to other places has the potential to spread that [avian flu] around,” said Dillman.

Carlo said he is working with his homeowner’s association to remove the carcasses to keep his family and neighbors safe.

The Count on 2 Investigators did reach out to the HOA property manager to see what other avenues they are taking since SCDNR and DHEC will not remove the dead vultures.

We have yet to hear back.

Plan approved to replace West Ashley middle school to reduce capacity

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The Charleston County School Board of Trustees has okayed a plan from staff to replace the current C.E. Williams North campus with a new school.At a Committee of the Whole meeting on Tuesday, the board voted to continue the current middle school configuration in West Ashley dividing sixth-grade students from seventh and eighth-grade students who currently go to C.E. Williams South, near West Ashley High School.The plan that would replace the sixth-grade campus would also allow Pattison’s Academy ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The Charleston County School Board of Trustees has okayed a plan from staff to replace the current C.E. Williams North campus with a new school.

At a Committee of the Whole meeting on Tuesday, the board voted to continue the current middle school configuration in West Ashley dividing sixth-grade students from seventh and eighth-grade students who currently go to C.E. Williams South, near West Ashley High School.

The plan that would replace the sixth-grade campus would also allow Pattison’s Academy for Comprehensive Education (PACE) to fund the design and construction of its facilities on the North campus. PACE is a specialty charter school run by a non-profit for students with multiple disabilities. They’re currently operating out of the former St. Andrews Middle School location.

The board committee also approved the expansion of the seventh/eighth grade C.E. Williams South campus by adding eight classrooms.

Despite the new building for sixth-grade students, the district’s plan does not expand capacity. The current building is underutilized with an enrollment of 363 this year. The building capacity is 904 according to data presented at the meeting.

The new building will be built to hold 600 students, with an expansion capacity of 900. This stands in stark contrast to the South campus which is nearing capacity. That building holds 969 students and currently has 835 students.

However, the district contends West Ashley is not growing as fast as it appears. If current projections remain unchanged the North campus is not expected to exceed 431 students in the next six years. The South campus is expected to peak at 848 students over the same time period.

Former West Ashley High School principal Lee Runyon says the district says the district’s plan is not properly taking into account growth in West Ashley.

“I think that the current plan is again short-sighted and smacks of continued use of taxpayer dollars to try and put a Band-Aid on the problem of systemic growth,” Runyon said. “Anytime you’re running an organization, you’re either growing or you’re dying. If the district is projecting flatline growth in a community that is exploding with residential growth, I think that’s poor leadership.”

Parents like Ragan DuBose-Morris say there are plenty of kids in West Ashley, but many parents are opting to send their middle schoolers out of District 10 to seek out more traditional options.

“West Ashley is the only area in Charleston County that does not have a traditional K-12 pipeline so that you can attend at a traditional elementary, middle and high school configuration,” DuBose-Morris said. “That has been a problem.”

The district’s own numbers suggest only 65 percent of students living in West Ashley attend the two campuses. Despite living in West Ashley, DuBose-Morris chooses to take her children to schools in North Charleston. She says whenever a child has to move to a new school there’s a transitional period that disrupts education. She says she wants to eliminate as many of those transitions as possible.

“They [children] have the knowledge of being in an environment for six through 12th grade,” DuBose-Morris said. “So we have stability, they’re not transitioning between schools. The guidance counselors know who they are. Their teachers know who they are. They’re able to progress through a process in which they have support.”

The current configuration was initiated in part to produce more diverse schools. Constituent board chair for District 10 (West Ashley) Rodney Lewis says the schools are now more diverse and the sixth-grade academy model can work. He says the smaller classes away from the influence of older students are helpful for students to enter adolescents.

“Any time there’s a new program it never just jumps off the first two or three years,” Lewis said. “You got to work it. It’s like a business. You start a business you won’t go to the top automatically. You have to grow there. Allow this to grow and you will see how it works.”

The project is part of the Phase Five Capital Buildings Program that is being funded by a one percent sales tax approved by voters in 2020. The project is budgeted for $40 million and is expected to be completed in 2026.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

West Ashley brewery adds 2nd taproom; hard kombucha brewery opening downtown

Two new taprooms are coming to Charleston in the next month.One is a newcomer specializing in lagers and hard kombucha, while the other is a household name known for signature beers like the Sungazer hazy IPA.Craft beer drinkers will find that beer and other refreshing sippers at Avondale brewery Charles Towne Fermentory, which will add a second taproom outfitted with a spacious beer garden, site owner Adam Goodwin told The Post and Courier.Thos...

Two new taprooms are coming to Charleston in the next month.

One is a newcomer specializing in lagers and hard kombucha, while the other is a household name known for signature beers like the Sungazer hazy IPA.

Craft beer drinkers will find that beer and other refreshing sippers at Avondale brewery Charles Towne Fermentory, which will add a second taproom outfitted with a spacious beer garden, site owner Adam Goodwin told The Post and Courier.

Those who attended Charleston Beer Week might recognize the new taproom called The Garden by Charles Towne Fermentory. The 1331 Ashley River Road compound, that was previously occupied by Wine and Design, hosted Beer Week’s grand finale in November 2021.

“When I found this property it was kind of just perfect,” Goodwin said. “We ended up fully gutting the building. We added (a nearly) 1,000-square-foot covered deck out back and then did all the landscaping outside to make it a little more of an accommodating place to hang and enjoy beer.”

Goodwin has the capability to brew small test batches at the new location, but the majority of The Garden’s 8-14 beers will come from Charles Towne Fermentory’s 5,000-square-foot Avondale brewery at 809 Savannah Highway.

Because of South Carolina’s three-tier system, Goodwin must purchase his own beer from a distributor in order to sell at The Garden, which will also offer wine and cider for non-beer drinkers.

The Garden will host a grand opening party May 28, with Co-Hog and Foxes Fried popping up with food at the event. Moving forward, The Garden will be open from 2-10 p.m. Monday-Friday, noon-10 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Sunday.

As Charles Towne Fermentory expands, downtown Charleston’s brewery district is adding another brewery to a list that already includes destinations like Revelry Brewing Co., Munkle Brewing Co. and Edmund’s Oast Brewing Co.

Specializing in lagers and hard kombucha, Bevi Bene Brewing Co. is located in The Lumberyard development at 1859 Summerville Ave. in downtown Charleston. Guests can expect to find eight beers and a handful of hard kombuchas when the new brewery opens June 18.

Husband-and-wife entrepreneurs Marissa and Clay Carlisle are behind Bevi Bene, which means “drink well” in Italian. The 5,000-square-foot space features an outdoor patio and mural by Savannah artist JULU that is visible heading northbound on Interstate 26.

“We’re a lager focused brewery,” Marissa Carlisle said. “We will have sours and then we’ll be introducing hard kombucha to the Charleston community.”

Specifically, Bevi Bene will serve traditional lagers, kettle sours and hard kombucha. “Mostly sessionable stuff which means lower alcohol just because we want people to come stay awhile,” according to Clay Carlisle.

To make the hard kombucha, he brews regular kombucha that’s put in a closed fermenter with more sugar and brewer’s yeast. The yeast eats the sugar, converting it into ethanol (alcohol produced by fermentation). Bevi Bene is believed to be the first Charleston area brewery to offer hard kombucha.

The brewery will host a grand opening on June 25, with food trucks Chucktown Meatball Co. and Vibrant Alkaline Vegan Meals serving at the event.

Once open, Bevi Bene will serve customers from 1-8 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday, noon-9 p.m. Friday-Saturday and noon-9 p.m. Sunday.

Editorial: Find better traffic solutions for West Ashley than I-526 extension

Skeptics of extending Interstate 526 from U.S. Highway 17 to Johns and James islands have called the project “a code, not a road,” a pithy rhyme that describes the project’s impracticality while recognizing the serious traffic problems — and the very real frustrations over those problems — that supporters have hoped the new road would magically solve.But with its price tag rising from $725 million several years ago to $2.35 billion today, and with Charleston County required to pay all but $380 million of ...

Skeptics of extending Interstate 526 from U.S. Highway 17 to Johns and James islands have called the project “a code, not a road,” a pithy rhyme that describes the project’s impracticality while recognizing the serious traffic problems — and the very real frustrations over those problems — that supporters have hoped the new road would magically solve.

But with its price tag rising from $725 million several years ago to $2.35 billion today, and with Charleston County required to pay all but $380 million of that — the state capped its commitment at $420 million and already has spent more than $45 million toward that cap — the project’s status has gone from impractical to practically ridiculous. Or, as Councilman Henry Darby said Thursday, “I don’t know whether to laugh or cry.”

Instead of getting kicked by the mule yet again, it’s time for Charleston County and state transportation officials to back away from the special status of this project, also known as the Mark Clark extension (even though it would be a 45 mph parkway, not an interstate), and instead redouble their efforts on other traffic solutions that can be completed more quickly, less expensively and with more widespread public favor.

This road is going nowhere fast, but that reality must not make officials too complacent to tackle the serious congestion problems that made extension advocates think it was a good idea in the first place. Even if a magical solution were to appear, the extension still would take more than a dozen years to build. S.C. Secretary of Transportation Christy Hall has recommended proceeding with about $150 million in engineering work to get the project ready for bid, but we urge her and Charleston County not to spend another cent.

Instead, they should use that money to launch a special planning effort to identify better options for easing congestion in West Ashley as well as on Johns and James islands. That would move us toward a solution faster than somehow hoping there will be a way forward for the Mark Clark extension when the state Transportation Department returns to the county in a few months with an even more refined cost estimate. Some council members suggest opponents have delayed 526 and driven up its costs. Even if that were true, and we would argue it’s not, they should think about this: Now that it costs more than $1 billion more, are those opponents going to give up now?

There are other solutions that aren’t as dramatic but also wouldn’t be nearly as costly or controversial, such as building the “pitchfork” roads on both sides of Maybank Highway from River Road to the Stono River bridge. The ongoing work to address Main Road, from Bees Ferry to Betsy Kerrison, also will help, and there are other projects in West Ashley that could help, too. We also believe our tax dollars would be better spent beginning a study on a bus rapid transit line through West Ashley similar to the one being developed along Rivers Avenue. In other words, we should seek many solutions, not a single, prohibitively expensive one.

Extending Interstate 526 across Johns and James islands in particular was never a good idea because of the environmental damage involved and the dubious impact it would have on traffic congestion, particularly when measured by the bang for the buck. More cost-effective solutions can address traffic without marring the edges of these two sea islands.

Look at it another way: From a traffic engineering standpoint, it might be easier to get around the Charleston region if Interstate 526 were extended from where it ends at U.S. Highway 17 in Mount Pleasant through the Old Village and across the Cooper River to where the James Island connector touches down on the peninsula. It would be like building our own ring road, like Interstate 285 around Atlanta.

Of course, nobody has suggested that — for a multitude of reasons that go far beyond cost.

For years, development on Johns Island has been allowed to spread rapidly while road improvements lagged far behind, a scenario that has played out in other parts of the Charleston metro area. Anyone who lives on Johns Island or travels there knows it’s a frustrating problem that also impacts West Ashley and James Island. But that’s another reason why state and local officials should step back from their grand 526 extension plan and refocus their thinking on more cost-effective, practical traffic solutions.

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

Tri-county school districts offering free meals this summer

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD)- With the end of the school year rapidly approaching, thousands of children across the state are at risk of going hungry.According to the South Carolina Department of Social Services, more than 467,000 children in South Carolina ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD)- With the end of the school year rapidly approaching, thousands of children across the state are at risk of going hungry.

According to the South Carolina Department of Social Services, more than 467,000 children in South Carolina qualify for free or reduced-price meals. State law mandates that all public schools participate in the National School Lunch Program.

To ensure children do not need to worry about where their next meal will come from, Tri-county school districts are offering free meal programs all summer long.

Charleston County

Charleston County School District is working to fill the nutrition gap during summer break with its Seamless Summer Feeding Program (SSFP).

The district reports that roughly half (25,000) of enrolled students qualify for free or reduced-price school meals, which is why they offer complimentary breakfast and lunches at locations throughout Charleston County.

Breakfast and homemade hot lunches will be prepared at 10 CCSD school kitchens and cafeterias and distributed to sites in McClellanville, North Charleston, James Island, Johns Island, Hollywood, downtown Charleston, and West Ashley for pickup. Serving and eating utensils, plates, napkins, and condiments will be provided.

Meals are prepared to meet federal meal patterns and nutritional requirements and lunches may include hot entrees such as crispy chicken nuggets, hamburgers, and hotdogs. Fresh fruits, vegetables, and low-fat chocolate and white milk are included with every meal.

Any child or teen (18 years old or younger) are eligible for free meals without prior approval.

The program starts June 6 and runs through August 5. Pickup locations will be posted here on June 10.

Berkeley County

Berkeley County School District is also offering a free meal service for children 18 years old and younger.

Beginning June 6, BSCD nutrition workers will serve meals every Monday through Thursday at the following locations:

Breakfast service is from 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. and includes 1 oz meat or meat alternate, 1 serving of grain, 1/2 cup juice or fruit, and an 8 oz milk.

Lunch service is from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and includes 2 oz meat or meat alternate, 1/2 cup vegetable, 1/2 cup fruit, 1 serving grain, and an 8 oz milk.

Hot meals are available at no cost to students, but children must eat at the site.

The program runs through July 28. Click here to see the menus.

Dorchester County

Through the Seamless Summer Option Meals Program, Dorchester District Two will provide breakfast and lunch on a first-come, first-served basis to all children 18 years old and younger.

Meals are served Monday through Thursday at the following locations:

Breakfast is available from 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. and lunch is available from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Each meal contains whole grains, protein, fruit or vegetable, and milk. As with Berkeley County, meals must be eaten at the pickup site.

In addition, DD2 schools conducting summer programs will provide complimentary breakfast and lunch to all program enrolled students.

The free meal program runs from June 6 to July 14.

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